Does vestibular-ocular-motor (VOM) impairment affect time to return to play, symptom severity, neurocognition and academic ability in student-athletes following acute concussion?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Authors

Colleges, School and Institutes

Abstract

Introduction: Research indicates Sports-Related Concussion (SRC) impairs Vestibular-Ocular-Motor (VOM) function. The aim was to explore if VOM impairment correlates with longer Return To Play (RTP), symptom burden, neurocognitive performance and academic capability.

Participants: 40 (61.4% male) Loughborough University, UK, rugby union student-athletes who sustained 42 SRCs.

Methods: Student-athletes completed an assessment battery during pre-season (baseline), 2, 4, 8 and 14 days post-SRC and prior to RTP and were managed according to the rugby Football Union’ community pathway.

Outcome measures: Vestibular Ocular-Motor Screening (VOMS), Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Test, Post-Concussion Symptom Scale, Perceived Academic Impairment Tool questionnaire and percentage of academic activities specifically missed due to SRC.

Results: VOMS scores were significantly (p < 0.005) greater than baseline at all time points except RTP. Presence of VOM dysfunction at 14 days post-SRC significantly correlated with a longer RTP, greater symptom burden and increased odds ratio at 2, 4 and 8 days and academic time loss at 2, 4 and 8 days post-SRC.

Conclusion: VOM impairment is associated with an increased symptom burden and impaired academic capability, and a longer time to RTP when present at 14 days post-SRC.

Bibliographic note

Funding Information: The authors would like to thank the Musculoskeletal Association of Chartered Physiotherapists and Association of Chartered Physiotherapist in Sports and Exercise Medicine for their kind research grants, which have supported the undertaking of this research. Funding Information: This work was supported by the Musculoskeletal Association of Chartered Physiotherapists [Level 3 Award]; Association of chartered physiotherapists in sports and exercise medicine [ACPSEM Research Grant]. The authors would like to thank the Musculoskeletal Association of Chartered Physiotherapists and Association of Chartered Physiotherapist in Sports and Exercise Medicine for their kind research grants, which have supported the undertaking of this research.

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)788-797
JournalBrain Injury
Volume35
Issue number7
Early online date24 Apr 2021
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jun 2021

Keywords

  • Sports-Related Concussion, Vestibular-Ocular-Motor Screening, academic capability, neurocognition, Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous), Clinical Neurology, Developmental and Educational Psychology