Does Security Increase Secularity? Evidence from the British Household Panel Survey on the Relationship between Income and Religious Service Attendance

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@article{d164e27fe040425fbba56d74b892cfc9,
title = "Does Security Increase Secularity? Evidence from the British Household Panel Survey on the Relationship between Income and Religious Service Attendance",
abstract = "Material security has been associated with lower religious attendance both between and within countries and has been proposed as one of the mechanisms causing long term religious decline in economically developed countries. Using a British panel study, this article examines (a) whether change to household incomes can incite individual religious change and (b) whether religion can buffer against the stress of economic loss. The main trend in Britain is that of religious stability or decline, and income change does nothing to reverse this trend. Increases in household income are associated with religious disengagement, but income reduction has no effect on religious attendance. However, religious activity may still act as a 'buffer' by improving and maintaining life satisfaction in the face of economic loss.",
keywords = "economic insecurity, life satisfaction, panel data, secularisation, stress buffering",
author = "Ingrid Storm",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1163/18748929-01003004",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "328--349",
journal = "Journal of Religion in Europe",
issn = "1874-8910",
publisher = "Brill",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does Security Increase Secularity? Evidence from the British Household Panel Survey on the Relationship between Income and Religious Service Attendance

AU - Storm, Ingrid

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Material security has been associated with lower religious attendance both between and within countries and has been proposed as one of the mechanisms causing long term religious decline in economically developed countries. Using a British panel study, this article examines (a) whether change to household incomes can incite individual religious change and (b) whether religion can buffer against the stress of economic loss. The main trend in Britain is that of religious stability or decline, and income change does nothing to reverse this trend. Increases in household income are associated with religious disengagement, but income reduction has no effect on religious attendance. However, religious activity may still act as a 'buffer' by improving and maintaining life satisfaction in the face of economic loss.

AB - Material security has been associated with lower religious attendance both between and within countries and has been proposed as one of the mechanisms causing long term religious decline in economically developed countries. Using a British panel study, this article examines (a) whether change to household incomes can incite individual religious change and (b) whether religion can buffer against the stress of economic loss. The main trend in Britain is that of religious stability or decline, and income change does nothing to reverse this trend. Increases in household income are associated with religious disengagement, but income reduction has no effect on religious attendance. However, religious activity may still act as a 'buffer' by improving and maintaining life satisfaction in the face of economic loss.

KW - economic insecurity

KW - life satisfaction

KW - panel data

KW - secularisation

KW - stress buffering

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85031285282&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1163/18748929-01003004

DO - 10.1163/18748929-01003004

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85031285282

VL - 10

SP - 328

EP - 349

JO - Journal of Religion in Europe

JF - Journal of Religion in Europe

SN - 1874-8910

IS - 3

ER -