Do Hospital Boards matter for better, safer, patient care?

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Do Hospital Boards matter for better, safer, patient care? / Mannion, Russell; Davies, Huw; Jacobs, Rowena; Kasteridis, Panos; Millar, Ross; Freeman, Tim.

In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 177, 01.03.2017, p. 278-287.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Mannion, Russell ; Davies, Huw ; Jacobs, Rowena ; Kasteridis, Panos ; Millar, Ross ; Freeman, Tim. / Do Hospital Boards matter for better, safer, patient care?. In: Social Science and Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 177. pp. 278-287.

Bibtex

@article{204f3e48d0574ba78cae2b19257960a0,
title = "Do Hospital Boards matter for better, safer, patient care?",
abstract = "Manifest failings in healthcare quality and safety in many countries have focused attention on the role of hospital Boards. While a growing literature has drawn attention to the potential impacts of Board composition and Board processes, little work has yet been carried out to examine the influence of Board competencies. In this work, we first validate the structure of an established {\textquoteleft}Board competencies{\textquoteright} self-assessment instrument in the English NHS (the Board Self-Assessment Questionnaire, or BSAQ). This tool is then used to explore in English acute hospitals the relationships between (a) Board competencies and staff perceptions about how well their organisation deals with quality and safety issues; and (b) Board competencies and a raft of patient safety and quality measures at organisation level.National survey data from 95 hospitals (334 Board members) confirmed the factor structure of the BSAQ, validating it for use in the English NHS. Moreover, better Board competencies were correlated in consistent ways with beneficial staff attitudes to the reporting and handling of quality and safety issues (using routinely collected data from the NHS National Staff Survey). However, relationships between Board competencies and aggregate outcomes for a variety of quality and safety measures showed largely inconsistent and non-significant relationships.Overall, these data suggest that Boards may be able to impact on important staff perceptions. Further work is required to unpack the impact of Board attributes on organisational aggregate outcomes.",
keywords = "Healthcare quality, Board competencies, Hospital Boards, Board governance, Patient safety",
author = "Russell Mannion and Huw Davies and Rowena Jacobs and Panos Kasteridis and Ross Millar and Tim Freeman",
year = "2017",
month = mar
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.socscimed.2017.01.045",
language = "English",
volume = "177",
pages = "278--287",
journal = "Social Science and Medicine",
issn = "0037-7856",
publisher = "Reed-Elsevier (India) Private Limited",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Do Hospital Boards matter for better, safer, patient care?

AU - Mannion, Russell

AU - Davies, Huw

AU - Jacobs, Rowena

AU - Kasteridis, Panos

AU - Millar, Ross

AU - Freeman, Tim

PY - 2017/3/1

Y1 - 2017/3/1

N2 - Manifest failings in healthcare quality and safety in many countries have focused attention on the role of hospital Boards. While a growing literature has drawn attention to the potential impacts of Board composition and Board processes, little work has yet been carried out to examine the influence of Board competencies. In this work, we first validate the structure of an established ‘Board competencies’ self-assessment instrument in the English NHS (the Board Self-Assessment Questionnaire, or BSAQ). This tool is then used to explore in English acute hospitals the relationships between (a) Board competencies and staff perceptions about how well their organisation deals with quality and safety issues; and (b) Board competencies and a raft of patient safety and quality measures at organisation level.National survey data from 95 hospitals (334 Board members) confirmed the factor structure of the BSAQ, validating it for use in the English NHS. Moreover, better Board competencies were correlated in consistent ways with beneficial staff attitudes to the reporting and handling of quality and safety issues (using routinely collected data from the NHS National Staff Survey). However, relationships between Board competencies and aggregate outcomes for a variety of quality and safety measures showed largely inconsistent and non-significant relationships.Overall, these data suggest that Boards may be able to impact on important staff perceptions. Further work is required to unpack the impact of Board attributes on organisational aggregate outcomes.

AB - Manifest failings in healthcare quality and safety in many countries have focused attention on the role of hospital Boards. While a growing literature has drawn attention to the potential impacts of Board composition and Board processes, little work has yet been carried out to examine the influence of Board competencies. In this work, we first validate the structure of an established ‘Board competencies’ self-assessment instrument in the English NHS (the Board Self-Assessment Questionnaire, or BSAQ). This tool is then used to explore in English acute hospitals the relationships between (a) Board competencies and staff perceptions about how well their organisation deals with quality and safety issues; and (b) Board competencies and a raft of patient safety and quality measures at organisation level.National survey data from 95 hospitals (334 Board members) confirmed the factor structure of the BSAQ, validating it for use in the English NHS. Moreover, better Board competencies were correlated in consistent ways with beneficial staff attitudes to the reporting and handling of quality and safety issues (using routinely collected data from the NHS National Staff Survey). However, relationships between Board competencies and aggregate outcomes for a variety of quality and safety measures showed largely inconsistent and non-significant relationships.Overall, these data suggest that Boards may be able to impact on important staff perceptions. Further work is required to unpack the impact of Board attributes on organisational aggregate outcomes.

KW - Healthcare quality

KW - Board competencies

KW - Hospital Boards

KW - Board governance

KW - Patient safety

U2 - 10.1016/j.socscimed.2017.01.045

DO - 10.1016/j.socscimed.2017.01.045

M3 - Article

VL - 177

SP - 278

EP - 287

JO - Social Science and Medicine

JF - Social Science and Medicine

SN - 0037-7856

ER -