Do acute effects of exercise on vascular function predict adaptation to training?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Do acute effects of exercise on vascular function predict adaptation to training? / Dawson, Ellen A.; Cable, N. Timothy; Green, Daniel J.; Thijssen, Dick H.J.

In: European journal of applied physiology, Vol. 118, No. 3, 01.03.2018, p. 523-530.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Dawson, Ellen A. ; Cable, N. Timothy ; Green, Daniel J. ; Thijssen, Dick H.J. / Do acute effects of exercise on vascular function predict adaptation to training?. In: European journal of applied physiology. 2018 ; Vol. 118, No. 3. pp. 523-530.

Bibtex

@article{859ac0634a284a478f10d458ddd40f8a,
title = "Do acute effects of exercise on vascular function predict adaptation to training?",
abstract = "Purpose: No previous study has explored the importance of exercise-induced changes in vascular function to prolonged adaptations. Therefore, the purpose was to explore the within-subject relationship between the acute post-exercise change in brachial artery endothelial function (flow-mediated dilation, FMD) and the change in resting FMD after a 2-week exercise training in healthy volunteers. Methods: Twenty one healthy, young men (24 ± 5 years) underwent assessment of brachial artery FMD using high-resolution ultrasound before and after 30-min of moderate-intensity cycle exercise (80% maximal heart rate). Subsequently, subjects performed five 30-min cycle exercise bouts at 80% maximal heart rate across a 2-week period, followed by repeat assessment of resting brachial FMD post-training. Results: Correcting for changes in diameter and shear, FMD did not change after the initial exercise bout (P = 0.26). However, a significant correlation was found between post-exercise changes in FMD and adaptation in resting FMD after training (r = 0.634, P = 0.002), where an acute decrease in post-exercise FMD resulted in a decrease in baseline FMD after 2 weeks and vice versa. We also found a positive correlation between antegrade shear rate during exercise and change in FMD% after acute exercise and after exercise training (r = 0.529 and 0.475, both P < 0.05). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that acute post-exercise changes in vascular function are related to changes in resting FMD after a 2-week endurance exercise training period in healthy men, an effect that may be related to exercise-induced increases in antegrade shear rate. This provides further insight into the relevance of acute changes in shear and FMD for subsequent adaptation.",
keywords = "Endothelial function, Exercise training, Vascular adaptation",
author = "Dawson, {Ellen A.} and Cable, {N. Timothy} and Green, {Daniel J.} and Thijssen, {Dick H.J.}",
year = "2018",
month = mar,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00421-017-3724-8",
language = "English",
volume = "118",
pages = "523--530",
journal = "European journal of applied physiology",
issn = "1439-6319",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Do acute effects of exercise on vascular function predict adaptation to training?

AU - Dawson, Ellen A.

AU - Cable, N. Timothy

AU - Green, Daniel J.

AU - Thijssen, Dick H.J.

PY - 2018/3/1

Y1 - 2018/3/1

N2 - Purpose: No previous study has explored the importance of exercise-induced changes in vascular function to prolonged adaptations. Therefore, the purpose was to explore the within-subject relationship between the acute post-exercise change in brachial artery endothelial function (flow-mediated dilation, FMD) and the change in resting FMD after a 2-week exercise training in healthy volunteers. Methods: Twenty one healthy, young men (24 ± 5 years) underwent assessment of brachial artery FMD using high-resolution ultrasound before and after 30-min of moderate-intensity cycle exercise (80% maximal heart rate). Subsequently, subjects performed five 30-min cycle exercise bouts at 80% maximal heart rate across a 2-week period, followed by repeat assessment of resting brachial FMD post-training. Results: Correcting for changes in diameter and shear, FMD did not change after the initial exercise bout (P = 0.26). However, a significant correlation was found between post-exercise changes in FMD and adaptation in resting FMD after training (r = 0.634, P = 0.002), where an acute decrease in post-exercise FMD resulted in a decrease in baseline FMD after 2 weeks and vice versa. We also found a positive correlation between antegrade shear rate during exercise and change in FMD% after acute exercise and after exercise training (r = 0.529 and 0.475, both P < 0.05). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that acute post-exercise changes in vascular function are related to changes in resting FMD after a 2-week endurance exercise training period in healthy men, an effect that may be related to exercise-induced increases in antegrade shear rate. This provides further insight into the relevance of acute changes in shear and FMD for subsequent adaptation.

AB - Purpose: No previous study has explored the importance of exercise-induced changes in vascular function to prolonged adaptations. Therefore, the purpose was to explore the within-subject relationship between the acute post-exercise change in brachial artery endothelial function (flow-mediated dilation, FMD) and the change in resting FMD after a 2-week exercise training in healthy volunteers. Methods: Twenty one healthy, young men (24 ± 5 years) underwent assessment of brachial artery FMD using high-resolution ultrasound before and after 30-min of moderate-intensity cycle exercise (80% maximal heart rate). Subsequently, subjects performed five 30-min cycle exercise bouts at 80% maximal heart rate across a 2-week period, followed by repeat assessment of resting brachial FMD post-training. Results: Correcting for changes in diameter and shear, FMD did not change after the initial exercise bout (P = 0.26). However, a significant correlation was found between post-exercise changes in FMD and adaptation in resting FMD after training (r = 0.634, P = 0.002), where an acute decrease in post-exercise FMD resulted in a decrease in baseline FMD after 2 weeks and vice versa. We also found a positive correlation between antegrade shear rate during exercise and change in FMD% after acute exercise and after exercise training (r = 0.529 and 0.475, both P < 0.05). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that acute post-exercise changes in vascular function are related to changes in resting FMD after a 2-week endurance exercise training period in healthy men, an effect that may be related to exercise-induced increases in antegrade shear rate. This provides further insight into the relevance of acute changes in shear and FMD for subsequent adaptation.

KW - Endothelial function

KW - Exercise training

KW - Vascular adaptation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85037735595&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00421-017-3724-8

DO - 10.1007/s00421-017-3724-8

M3 - Article

C2 - 29234916

AN - SCOPUS:85037735595

VL - 118

SP - 523

EP - 530

JO - European journal of applied physiology

JF - European journal of applied physiology

SN - 1439-6319

IS - 3

ER -