Disorders of shared representations

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Standard

Disorders of shared representations. / Cook, Jennifer.

Shared representations: sensorimotor foundations of social life. ed. / Sukhvinder S. Obhi; Emily S. Cross. Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2016. p. 460-479 (Cambridge Social Neuroscience).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Harvard

Cook, J 2016, Disorders of shared representations. in SS Obhi & ES Cross (eds), Shared representations: sensorimotor foundations of social life. Cambridge Social Neuroscience, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 460-479. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781107279353.024

APA

Cook, J. (2016). Disorders of shared representations. In S. S. Obhi, & E. S. Cross (Eds.), Shared representations: sensorimotor foundations of social life (pp. 460-479). (Cambridge Social Neuroscience). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781107279353.024

Vancouver

Cook J. Disorders of shared representations. In Obhi SS, Cross ES, editors, Shared representations: sensorimotor foundations of social life. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 2016. p. 460-479. (Cambridge Social Neuroscience). https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781107279353.024

Author

Cook, Jennifer. / Disorders of shared representations. Shared representations: sensorimotor foundations of social life. editor / Sukhvinder S. Obhi ; Emily S. Cross. Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2016. pp. 460-479 (Cambridge Social Neuroscience).

Bibtex

@inbook{860b3df600184ddcb77eb5092e607d12,
title = "Disorders of shared representations",
abstract = "This chapter will begin with a focus on a particular subtopic within theshared representations research domain: imitation. Imitation occurs whenthe perception of another{\textquoteright}s actions causes the activation of the correspondingmotor representation in the observer. Thus imitation relates to sharedrepresentations in that it concerns the activation of a self- related representationby an other- related representation. In this chapter, I will use examplesfrom the autism spectrum conditions (ASCs) literature to argue that if either the self- or other- related representation is atypical this can result in atypical imitation. In other words, if action observation or action execution mechanisms are atypical, then imitation will be affected. I will conclude this chapter by drawing on research that extends this logic to other sociocognitive domains such as empathy and to conditions such as schizophrenia and alexithymia. ",
author = "Jennifer Cook",
note = "Chapter 23 from Part V - Learning and Development",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1017/CBO9781107279353.024",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-1-107-05020-4",
series = "Cambridge Social Neuroscience",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
pages = "460--479",
editor = "Obhi, {Sukhvinder S.} and Cross, {Emily S.}",
booktitle = "Shared representations:",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - Disorders of shared representations

AU - Cook, Jennifer

N1 - Chapter 23 from Part V - Learning and Development

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - This chapter will begin with a focus on a particular subtopic within theshared representations research domain: imitation. Imitation occurs whenthe perception of another’s actions causes the activation of the correspondingmotor representation in the observer. Thus imitation relates to sharedrepresentations in that it concerns the activation of a self- related representationby an other- related representation. In this chapter, I will use examplesfrom the autism spectrum conditions (ASCs) literature to argue that if either the self- or other- related representation is atypical this can result in atypical imitation. In other words, if action observation or action execution mechanisms are atypical, then imitation will be affected. I will conclude this chapter by drawing on research that extends this logic to other sociocognitive domains such as empathy and to conditions such as schizophrenia and alexithymia.

AB - This chapter will begin with a focus on a particular subtopic within theshared representations research domain: imitation. Imitation occurs whenthe perception of another’s actions causes the activation of the correspondingmotor representation in the observer. Thus imitation relates to sharedrepresentations in that it concerns the activation of a self- related representationby an other- related representation. In this chapter, I will use examplesfrom the autism spectrum conditions (ASCs) literature to argue that if either the self- or other- related representation is atypical this can result in atypical imitation. In other words, if action observation or action execution mechanisms are atypical, then imitation will be affected. I will conclude this chapter by drawing on research that extends this logic to other sociocognitive domains such as empathy and to conditions such as schizophrenia and alexithymia.

UR - https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/shared-representations/19139A40EE78E5423251D98821A517EC

U2 - 10.1017/CBO9781107279353.024

DO - 10.1017/CBO9781107279353.024

M3 - Chapter

SN - 978-1-107-05020-4

SN - 978-1-107-69031-8

T3 - Cambridge Social Neuroscience

SP - 460

EP - 479

BT - Shared representations:

A2 - Obhi, Sukhvinder S.

A2 - Cross, Emily S.

PB - Cambridge University Press

CY - Cambridge

ER -