Disability, Depression and Suicide Ideation in People with Multiple Sclerosis

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Disability, Depression and Suicide Ideation in People with Multiple Sclerosis. / Lewis, Vicky; Katherine, Williams; Koko, Chit ; Woolmore, John ; Jones, Christopher; Powell, Theresa.

In: Journal of Affective Disorders, 02.10.2016.

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@article{ff6c127230034bedb8eec2411fb954d1,
title = "Disability, Depression and Suicide Ideation in People with Multiple Sclerosis",
abstract = "IntroductionDepressive symptoms occur frequently in people with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and rates of suicide ideation are higher than the general population. There is evidence for a direct association between disability and depression, disability and suicide ideation, and depression and suicide ideation in MS. However, the relationship between all three, i.e. the mediating role of depression between disability and suicidal ideation, has not been investigated. Exploring this relationship could highlight risk factors, alerting clinicians to the need for timely intervention.MethodSeventy five people with progressive MS attending two out-patient clinics took part in this cross-sectional study. Participants completed the Beck Suicide Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale and Guy's Neurological Disability Scale.ResultsDepressive symptoms mediated the relationship between perceived and actual disability and suicide ideation. Different types of disability were associated with suicidality, including: {\textquoteleft}tremors{\textquoteright} and {\textquoteleft}taking longer to do things{\textquoteright}. A small sub-group were identified who reported suicide ideation in the presence of only mild levels of depression, supporting a concept termed {\textquoteleft}rational{\textquoteright} suicide.LimitationsThere may be a sample bias in this study as all participants were attending out-patient clinics and receiving support which may not be available to everyone with MS.ConclusionIt is important for clinicians to screen regularly for both depression and suicide ideation, to be alert to specific types of disability for which a higher level of suicide ideation might be present and to consider the possibility of suicidal thoughts being present in people who show minimal or no depressive symptoms.",
keywords = "Multiple Sclerosis, suicide ideation, disability, depression",
author = "Vicky Lewis and Williams Katherine and Chit Koko and John Woolmore and Christopher Jones and Theresa Powell",
year = "2016",
month = oct,
day = "2",
doi = "10.1016/j.jad.2016.08.038",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Affective Disorders",
issn = "0165-0327",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Disability, Depression and Suicide Ideation in People with Multiple Sclerosis

AU - Lewis, Vicky

AU - Katherine, Williams

AU - Koko, Chit

AU - Woolmore, John

AU - Jones, Christopher

AU - Powell, Theresa

PY - 2016/10/2

Y1 - 2016/10/2

N2 - IntroductionDepressive symptoms occur frequently in people with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and rates of suicide ideation are higher than the general population. There is evidence for a direct association between disability and depression, disability and suicide ideation, and depression and suicide ideation in MS. However, the relationship between all three, i.e. the mediating role of depression between disability and suicidal ideation, has not been investigated. Exploring this relationship could highlight risk factors, alerting clinicians to the need for timely intervention.MethodSeventy five people with progressive MS attending two out-patient clinics took part in this cross-sectional study. Participants completed the Beck Suicide Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale and Guy's Neurological Disability Scale.ResultsDepressive symptoms mediated the relationship between perceived and actual disability and suicide ideation. Different types of disability were associated with suicidality, including: ‘tremors’ and ‘taking longer to do things’. A small sub-group were identified who reported suicide ideation in the presence of only mild levels of depression, supporting a concept termed ‘rational’ suicide.LimitationsThere may be a sample bias in this study as all participants were attending out-patient clinics and receiving support which may not be available to everyone with MS.ConclusionIt is important for clinicians to screen regularly for both depression and suicide ideation, to be alert to specific types of disability for which a higher level of suicide ideation might be present and to consider the possibility of suicidal thoughts being present in people who show minimal or no depressive symptoms.

AB - IntroductionDepressive symptoms occur frequently in people with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and rates of suicide ideation are higher than the general population. There is evidence for a direct association between disability and depression, disability and suicide ideation, and depression and suicide ideation in MS. However, the relationship between all three, i.e. the mediating role of depression between disability and suicidal ideation, has not been investigated. Exploring this relationship could highlight risk factors, alerting clinicians to the need for timely intervention.MethodSeventy five people with progressive MS attending two out-patient clinics took part in this cross-sectional study. Participants completed the Beck Suicide Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale and Guy's Neurological Disability Scale.ResultsDepressive symptoms mediated the relationship between perceived and actual disability and suicide ideation. Different types of disability were associated with suicidality, including: ‘tremors’ and ‘taking longer to do things’. A small sub-group were identified who reported suicide ideation in the presence of only mild levels of depression, supporting a concept termed ‘rational’ suicide.LimitationsThere may be a sample bias in this study as all participants were attending out-patient clinics and receiving support which may not be available to everyone with MS.ConclusionIt is important for clinicians to screen regularly for both depression and suicide ideation, to be alert to specific types of disability for which a higher level of suicide ideation might be present and to consider the possibility of suicidal thoughts being present in people who show minimal or no depressive symptoms.

KW - Multiple Sclerosis

KW - suicide ideation

KW - disability

KW - depression

U2 - 10.1016/j.jad.2016.08.038

DO - 10.1016/j.jad.2016.08.038

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Affective Disorders

JF - Journal of Affective Disorders

SN - 0165-0327

ER -