Determinants of "return to work in good health" among workers with back pain who consult in primary care settings: A two-year prospective study

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Determinants of "return to work in good health" among workers with back pain who consult in primary care settings: A two-year prospective study. / Dionne, C; Bourbonnais, R; Fremont, P; Rossignol, M; Stock, SR; Nouwen, Arie; Larocque, I; Demers, E.

In: European Spine Journal, Vol. 16, 14.05.2007, p. 641-655.

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Dionne, C ; Bourbonnais, R ; Fremont, P ; Rossignol, M ; Stock, SR ; Nouwen, Arie ; Larocque, I ; Demers, E. / Determinants of "return to work in good health" among workers with back pain who consult in primary care settings: A two-year prospective study. In: European Spine Journal. 2007 ; Vol. 16. pp. 641-655.

Bibtex

@article{6b8b636f1ef14eb19c4632fe4cf6e50c,
title = "Determinants of {"}return to work in good health{"} among workers with back pain who consult in primary care settings: A two-year prospective study",
abstract = "Many factors have been linked to return to work after a back pain episode, but our understanding of this phenomenon is limited and cross-sectional dichotomous indices of return to work are not valid measures of this construct. To describe the course of {"}return to work in good health{"} (RWGH--a composite index of back pain outcome) among workers who consulted in primary care settings for back pain and identify its determinants, a 2-year prospective study was conducted. Subjects (n = 1,007, 68.4%) were workers who consulted in primary care settings of the Quebec City area for a nonspecific back pain. They completed five telephone interviews over 2 years (follow-up = 86%). Analyses linking baseline variables with 2-year outcome were conducted with polytomous logistic regression. The proportion of {"}success{"} in RWGH increased from 18% at 6 weeks to 57% at 2 years. In women, persistent pain, pain radiating to extremities, increasing job seniority, not having a unionized job, feeling that the physician did listen carefully and increasing fear-avoidance beliefs towards work and activity were determinants of {"}failure{"} in RWGH. In men, decreasing age, cigarette smoking, poor self-reported health status, pain in the thoracic area, previous back surgeries, a non-compensated injury, high pain levels, belief that job is below qualifications, likelihood of losing job, job status, satisfaction with health services and fear-avoidance beliefs towards work were all significant. RWGH among workers with back pain receives multiple influences, especially among men. In both genders, however, fear-avoidance beliefs about work are associated with failure and high self-efficacy is associated with success.",
author = "C Dionne and R Bourbonnais and P Fremont and M Rossignol and SR Stock and Arie Nouwen and I Larocque and E Demers",
year = "2007",
month = may,
day = "14",
doi = "10.1007/s00586-006-0180-2",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "641--655",
journal = "European Spine Journal",
issn = "0940-6719",
publisher = "Springer",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Determinants of "return to work in good health" among workers with back pain who consult in primary care settings: A two-year prospective study

AU - Dionne, C

AU - Bourbonnais, R

AU - Fremont, P

AU - Rossignol, M

AU - Stock, SR

AU - Nouwen, Arie

AU - Larocque, I

AU - Demers, E

PY - 2007/5/14

Y1 - 2007/5/14

N2 - Many factors have been linked to return to work after a back pain episode, but our understanding of this phenomenon is limited and cross-sectional dichotomous indices of return to work are not valid measures of this construct. To describe the course of "return to work in good health" (RWGH--a composite index of back pain outcome) among workers who consulted in primary care settings for back pain and identify its determinants, a 2-year prospective study was conducted. Subjects (n = 1,007, 68.4%) were workers who consulted in primary care settings of the Quebec City area for a nonspecific back pain. They completed five telephone interviews over 2 years (follow-up = 86%). Analyses linking baseline variables with 2-year outcome were conducted with polytomous logistic regression. The proportion of "success" in RWGH increased from 18% at 6 weeks to 57% at 2 years. In women, persistent pain, pain radiating to extremities, increasing job seniority, not having a unionized job, feeling that the physician did listen carefully and increasing fear-avoidance beliefs towards work and activity were determinants of "failure" in RWGH. In men, decreasing age, cigarette smoking, poor self-reported health status, pain in the thoracic area, previous back surgeries, a non-compensated injury, high pain levels, belief that job is below qualifications, likelihood of losing job, job status, satisfaction with health services and fear-avoidance beliefs towards work were all significant. RWGH among workers with back pain receives multiple influences, especially among men. In both genders, however, fear-avoidance beliefs about work are associated with failure and high self-efficacy is associated with success.

AB - Many factors have been linked to return to work after a back pain episode, but our understanding of this phenomenon is limited and cross-sectional dichotomous indices of return to work are not valid measures of this construct. To describe the course of "return to work in good health" (RWGH--a composite index of back pain outcome) among workers who consulted in primary care settings for back pain and identify its determinants, a 2-year prospective study was conducted. Subjects (n = 1,007, 68.4%) were workers who consulted in primary care settings of the Quebec City area for a nonspecific back pain. They completed five telephone interviews over 2 years (follow-up = 86%). Analyses linking baseline variables with 2-year outcome were conducted with polytomous logistic regression. The proportion of "success" in RWGH increased from 18% at 6 weeks to 57% at 2 years. In women, persistent pain, pain radiating to extremities, increasing job seniority, not having a unionized job, feeling that the physician did listen carefully and increasing fear-avoidance beliefs towards work and activity were determinants of "failure" in RWGH. In men, decreasing age, cigarette smoking, poor self-reported health status, pain in the thoracic area, previous back surgeries, a non-compensated injury, high pain levels, belief that job is below qualifications, likelihood of losing job, job status, satisfaction with health services and fear-avoidance beliefs towards work were all significant. RWGH among workers with back pain receives multiple influences, especially among men. In both genders, however, fear-avoidance beliefs about work are associated with failure and high self-efficacy is associated with success.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34248577294&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00586-006-0180-2

DO - 10.1007/s00586-006-0180-2

M3 - Article

C2 - 16868783

VL - 16

SP - 641

EP - 655

JO - European Spine Journal

JF - European Spine Journal

SN - 0940-6719

ER -