Depth: the forgotten dimension in multisensory research

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Depth: the forgotten dimension in multisensory research. / van der Stoep, Nathan; Serino, Andrea; Farnè, Andrea; Di Luca, Massimiliano; Spence, Charles.

In: Multisensory Research, Vol. 29, No. 6-7, 08.08.2016, p. 493-524.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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van der Stoep, N, Serino, A, Farnè, A, Di Luca, M & Spence, C 2016, 'Depth: the forgotten dimension in multisensory research', Multisensory Research, vol. 29, no. 6-7, pp. 493-524. https://doi.org/10.1163/22134808-00002525

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van der Stoep, Nathan ; Serino, Andrea ; Farnè, Andrea ; Di Luca, Massimiliano ; Spence, Charles. / Depth: the forgotten dimension in multisensory research. In: Multisensory Research. 2016 ; Vol. 29, No. 6-7. pp. 493-524.

Bibtex

@article{5f89593ddd024d04bb5eec086e5df9a8,
title = "Depth: the forgotten dimension in multisensory research",
abstract = "The last quarter of a century has seen a dramatic rise of interest in the spatial constraints onmultisensory integration. However, until very recently, the majority of this research hasinvestigated integration in the space directly in front of the observer. The space around us,however, extends in three spatial dimensions in the front and to the rear beyond such alimited area. The question to be addressed in this review concerns whether multisensoryintegration operates according to the same rules throughout the whole of 3-D space. Theresults reviewed here not only show that the space around us seems to be divided into distinctfunctional regions, but they also suggest that multisensory interactions are modulated by theregion of space in which stimuli happen to be presented. We highlight a number of keylimitations with previous research in this area, including: 1) The focus on only a very narrowregion of 2-D space in front of the observer; 2) The use of mostly static stimuli; 3) The studyof observers who themselves have been mostly static; and 4) The study of isolated observers.All of these factors may change the way in which the senses interact at any given distance, ascan the emotional state/personality of the observer. In summarizing these salient issues, wehope to encourage researchers to consider these factors in their own research in order to gaina better understanding of the spatial constraints on multisensory integration as they affect usin our everyday life. ",
author = "{van der Stoep}, Nathan and Andrea Serino and Andrea Farn{\`e} and {Di Luca}, Massimiliano and Charles Spence",
year = "2016",
month = aug,
day = "8",
doi = "10.1163/22134808-00002525",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "493--524",
journal = "Multisensory Research",
issn = "2213-4794",
publisher = "Brill",
number = "6-7",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Depth: the forgotten dimension in multisensory research

AU - van der Stoep, Nathan

AU - Serino, Andrea

AU - Farnè, Andrea

AU - Di Luca, Massimiliano

AU - Spence, Charles

PY - 2016/8/8

Y1 - 2016/8/8

N2 - The last quarter of a century has seen a dramatic rise of interest in the spatial constraints onmultisensory integration. However, until very recently, the majority of this research hasinvestigated integration in the space directly in front of the observer. The space around us,however, extends in three spatial dimensions in the front and to the rear beyond such alimited area. The question to be addressed in this review concerns whether multisensoryintegration operates according to the same rules throughout the whole of 3-D space. Theresults reviewed here not only show that the space around us seems to be divided into distinctfunctional regions, but they also suggest that multisensory interactions are modulated by theregion of space in which stimuli happen to be presented. We highlight a number of keylimitations with previous research in this area, including: 1) The focus on only a very narrowregion of 2-D space in front of the observer; 2) The use of mostly static stimuli; 3) The studyof observers who themselves have been mostly static; and 4) The study of isolated observers.All of these factors may change the way in which the senses interact at any given distance, ascan the emotional state/personality of the observer. In summarizing these salient issues, wehope to encourage researchers to consider these factors in their own research in order to gaina better understanding of the spatial constraints on multisensory integration as they affect usin our everyday life.

AB - The last quarter of a century has seen a dramatic rise of interest in the spatial constraints onmultisensory integration. However, until very recently, the majority of this research hasinvestigated integration in the space directly in front of the observer. The space around us,however, extends in three spatial dimensions in the front and to the rear beyond such alimited area. The question to be addressed in this review concerns whether multisensoryintegration operates according to the same rules throughout the whole of 3-D space. Theresults reviewed here not only show that the space around us seems to be divided into distinctfunctional regions, but they also suggest that multisensory interactions are modulated by theregion of space in which stimuli happen to be presented. We highlight a number of keylimitations with previous research in this area, including: 1) The focus on only a very narrowregion of 2-D space in front of the observer; 2) The use of mostly static stimuli; 3) The studyof observers who themselves have been mostly static; and 4) The study of isolated observers.All of these factors may change the way in which the senses interact at any given distance, ascan the emotional state/personality of the observer. In summarizing these salient issues, wehope to encourage researchers to consider these factors in their own research in order to gaina better understanding of the spatial constraints on multisensory integration as they affect usin our everyday life.

U2 - 10.1163/22134808-00002525

DO - 10.1163/22134808-00002525

M3 - Article

VL - 29

SP - 493

EP - 524

JO - Multisensory Research

JF - Multisensory Research

SN - 2213-4794

IS - 6-7

ER -