Delayed reactive distractor suppression in aging populations

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Delayed reactive distractor suppression in aging populations. / Ashinoff, Brandon; Geng, Joy; Mevorach, Carmel.

In: Psychology and Aging, Vol. 34, No. 3, 05.2019, p. 418-430.

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Ashinoff, Brandon ; Geng, Joy ; Mevorach, Carmel. / Delayed reactive distractor suppression in aging populations. In: Psychology and Aging. 2019 ; Vol. 34, No. 3. pp. 418-430.

Bibtex

@article{50e9364d952348d39c023216fb05a3e2,
title = "Delayed reactive distractor suppression in aging populations",
abstract = "Previous studies have tended to infer that reactive control is intact in aging populations because of evidence that proactive control is impaired and that older participants appear to favor reactive control strategies. However, most of these studies did not compare reactive control in young and older participants directly. In our study, a young (18 to 21 years old) and older (60+ years old) cohort engaged in a task that assesses reactive distractor suppression where participants had to discriminate between an upright and inverted T-shape in the presence of a salient or nonsalient distractor. In previous studies using this paradigm (DiQuattro & Geng, 2011) young participants reactively used the salient distractor as an anticue and performed better (faster reaction time [RT] and higher accuracy) when it was present. It was found that older participants were not able to reactively suppress the salient distractor with a 200-ms display but were able to do so with a 600-ms display. It was concluded that the initiation of reactive suppression is delayed for older participants, but that effective suppression is possible given enough time.",
keywords = "Cognitive aging, Cognitive control, Distractor suppression, Reactive control, Salience suppression",
author = "Brandon Ashinoff and Joy Geng and Carmel Mevorach",
year = "2019",
month = may,
doi = "10.1037/pag0000336",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "418--430",
journal = "Psychology and Aging",
issn = "0882-7974",
publisher = "American Psychological Association",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Delayed reactive distractor suppression in aging populations

AU - Ashinoff, Brandon

AU - Geng, Joy

AU - Mevorach, Carmel

PY - 2019/5

Y1 - 2019/5

N2 - Previous studies have tended to infer that reactive control is intact in aging populations because of evidence that proactive control is impaired and that older participants appear to favor reactive control strategies. However, most of these studies did not compare reactive control in young and older participants directly. In our study, a young (18 to 21 years old) and older (60+ years old) cohort engaged in a task that assesses reactive distractor suppression where participants had to discriminate between an upright and inverted T-shape in the presence of a salient or nonsalient distractor. In previous studies using this paradigm (DiQuattro & Geng, 2011) young participants reactively used the salient distractor as an anticue and performed better (faster reaction time [RT] and higher accuracy) when it was present. It was found that older participants were not able to reactively suppress the salient distractor with a 200-ms display but were able to do so with a 600-ms display. It was concluded that the initiation of reactive suppression is delayed for older participants, but that effective suppression is possible given enough time.

AB - Previous studies have tended to infer that reactive control is intact in aging populations because of evidence that proactive control is impaired and that older participants appear to favor reactive control strategies. However, most of these studies did not compare reactive control in young and older participants directly. In our study, a young (18 to 21 years old) and older (60+ years old) cohort engaged in a task that assesses reactive distractor suppression where participants had to discriminate between an upright and inverted T-shape in the presence of a salient or nonsalient distractor. In previous studies using this paradigm (DiQuattro & Geng, 2011) young participants reactively used the salient distractor as an anticue and performed better (faster reaction time [RT] and higher accuracy) when it was present. It was found that older participants were not able to reactively suppress the salient distractor with a 200-ms display but were able to do so with a 600-ms display. It was concluded that the initiation of reactive suppression is delayed for older participants, but that effective suppression is possible given enough time.

KW - Cognitive aging

KW - Cognitive control

KW - Distractor suppression

KW - Reactive control

KW - Salience suppression

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85061964681&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/pag0000336

DO - 10.1037/pag0000336

M3 - Article

VL - 34

SP - 418

EP - 430

JO - Psychology and Aging

JF - Psychology and Aging

SN - 0882-7974

IS - 3

ER -