Current nature and management of cancer of the oesophagus and cardia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Current nature and management of cancer of the oesophagus and cardia. / Gillison, EW; Powell, Dorothy; McConkey, Christopher; Spychal, Robert.

In: British Journal of Surgery, Vol. 87, No. 3, 01.03.2000, p. 362.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Gillison, EW ; Powell, Dorothy ; McConkey, Christopher ; Spychal, Robert. / Current nature and management of cancer of the oesophagus and cardia. In: British Journal of Surgery. 2000 ; Vol. 87, No. 3. pp. 362.

Bibtex

@article{959e82c0a7ca415aaf13af19598b94af,
title = "Current nature and management of cancer of the oesophagus and cardia",
abstract = "Aims: To inform the debate about upper gastrointestinal cancer care in the UK, the incidence of cancer of the oesophagus and cardia (OGJ) was determined in the West Midlands, a region covering 10 per cent of England and Wales, with particular reference to the methods of treatment. METHODS: The case-notes of 2776 patients diagnosed with oesophageal and OGJ cancer in the 5 years from 1 January 1992 to 31 December 1996 were scrutinized by one experienced surgeon. Tumour types were classified by histology and site, and treatment modalities assessed for 30-day mortality rate together with life-table analyses. RESULTS: Oesophageal cancer was identified in 2188 patients (61 per cent lower, 34 per cent middle, 4 per cent upper), including 999 squamous carcinomas (27 per cent lower, 64 per cent middle, 9 per cent upper) and 995 adenocarcinomas (97 per cent lower, 3 per cent middle), while there were 588 cases of OGJ cancer (94 per cent adenocarcinomas). Resection was the commonest treatment (865 cases; 31 per cent), with a mortality rate of 10 per cent for oesophageal and 4 per cent for OGJ cancer. Palliative resection had a higher mortality rate than radiotherapy (9 versus 3 per cent), compared with 22 per cent for endoscopic palliation, while the 30-day mortality rate was 30 per cent for the 308 patients given no treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Squamous carcinomas and adenocarcinomas of the oesophageal body are now equally common; lower-third and OGJ tumours are predominantly adenocarcinomas. This study provides baseline data for critical appraisal of potential changes in the delivery of upper gastrointestinal cancer in the UK.",
author = "EW Gillison and Dorothy Powell and Christopher McConkey and Robert Spychal",
year = "2000",
month = mar,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1046/j.1365-2168.2000.01383-3.x",
language = "English",
volume = "87",
pages = "362",
journal = "British Journal of Surgery",
issn = "0007-1323",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Current nature and management of cancer of the oesophagus and cardia

AU - Gillison, EW

AU - Powell, Dorothy

AU - McConkey, Christopher

AU - Spychal, Robert

PY - 2000/3/1

Y1 - 2000/3/1

N2 - Aims: To inform the debate about upper gastrointestinal cancer care in the UK, the incidence of cancer of the oesophagus and cardia (OGJ) was determined in the West Midlands, a region covering 10 per cent of England and Wales, with particular reference to the methods of treatment. METHODS: The case-notes of 2776 patients diagnosed with oesophageal and OGJ cancer in the 5 years from 1 January 1992 to 31 December 1996 were scrutinized by one experienced surgeon. Tumour types were classified by histology and site, and treatment modalities assessed for 30-day mortality rate together with life-table analyses. RESULTS: Oesophageal cancer was identified in 2188 patients (61 per cent lower, 34 per cent middle, 4 per cent upper), including 999 squamous carcinomas (27 per cent lower, 64 per cent middle, 9 per cent upper) and 995 adenocarcinomas (97 per cent lower, 3 per cent middle), while there were 588 cases of OGJ cancer (94 per cent adenocarcinomas). Resection was the commonest treatment (865 cases; 31 per cent), with a mortality rate of 10 per cent for oesophageal and 4 per cent for OGJ cancer. Palliative resection had a higher mortality rate than radiotherapy (9 versus 3 per cent), compared with 22 per cent for endoscopic palliation, while the 30-day mortality rate was 30 per cent for the 308 patients given no treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Squamous carcinomas and adenocarcinomas of the oesophageal body are now equally common; lower-third and OGJ tumours are predominantly adenocarcinomas. This study provides baseline data for critical appraisal of potential changes in the delivery of upper gastrointestinal cancer in the UK.

AB - Aims: To inform the debate about upper gastrointestinal cancer care in the UK, the incidence of cancer of the oesophagus and cardia (OGJ) was determined in the West Midlands, a region covering 10 per cent of England and Wales, with particular reference to the methods of treatment. METHODS: The case-notes of 2776 patients diagnosed with oesophageal and OGJ cancer in the 5 years from 1 January 1992 to 31 December 1996 were scrutinized by one experienced surgeon. Tumour types were classified by histology and site, and treatment modalities assessed for 30-day mortality rate together with life-table analyses. RESULTS: Oesophageal cancer was identified in 2188 patients (61 per cent lower, 34 per cent middle, 4 per cent upper), including 999 squamous carcinomas (27 per cent lower, 64 per cent middle, 9 per cent upper) and 995 adenocarcinomas (97 per cent lower, 3 per cent middle), while there were 588 cases of OGJ cancer (94 per cent adenocarcinomas). Resection was the commonest treatment (865 cases; 31 per cent), with a mortality rate of 10 per cent for oesophageal and 4 per cent for OGJ cancer. Palliative resection had a higher mortality rate than radiotherapy (9 versus 3 per cent), compared with 22 per cent for endoscopic palliation, while the 30-day mortality rate was 30 per cent for the 308 patients given no treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Squamous carcinomas and adenocarcinomas of the oesophageal body are now equally common; lower-third and OGJ tumours are predominantly adenocarcinomas. This study provides baseline data for critical appraisal of potential changes in the delivery of upper gastrointestinal cancer in the UK.

U2 - 10.1046/j.1365-2168.2000.01383-3.x

DO - 10.1046/j.1365-2168.2000.01383-3.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 10718965

VL - 87

SP - 362

JO - British Journal of Surgery

JF - British Journal of Surgery

SN - 0007-1323

IS - 3

ER -