CTX-M: Changing the face of ESBLs in the UK

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CTX-M: Changing the face of ESBLs in the UK. / Livermore, DM; Hawkey, Peter.

In: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, 01.01.2005, p. 451-54.

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@article{ceac57914f254662952926409a52625d,
title = "CTX-M: Changing the face of ESBLs in the UK",
abstract = "The UK has experienced a sudden rise in extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) rates, largely due to the appearance and spread of Escherichia coli producing CTX-M-15 type beta-lactamase. The British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy organized two update meetings during 2004 to report and discuss the recognition, clinical diagnosis, treatment and control of bacteria producing these beta-lactamases. This paper reports the data and reviews made by contributors to the conferences. The historical distribution and emergence of ESBLs was reviewed along with the emergence of plasmid-mediated CTX-M ESBLs following their mobilization from the chromosome of Kluyvera spp. The first significant outbreak of CTX-M producers in the UK occurred in 2001 and involved Klebsiella pneumoniae with CTX-M-26 at one site, but by 2003, cloned and diverse E. coli with CTX-M-15 were widespread, with Shropshire one of the most affected regions. The specific experience in Shropshire was reported on and a comprehensive review made of the level of awareness of the need for ESBL detection in laboratories in England and Wales, together with a description of the variety of methods that may be applied, with recommendations for optimal methodology. The increased mortality associated with inappropriate treatment of infections caused by ESBL-producing strains was highlighted, together with discussion on potential control of cross-infection. The meeting concluded that the CTX-M genes have now become widespread in not only E. coli but other Enterobacteriaceae in the UK and this will represent a substantial threat to both the treatment of infections caused by these bacteria in the community and within hospitals.",
keywords = "extended-spectrum beta-lactamases, ESBLs, BSAC",
author = "DM Livermore and Peter Hawkey",
year = "2005",
month = jan,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/jac/dki239",
language = "English",
pages = "451--54",
journal = "Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy",
issn = "0305-7453",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - CTX-M: Changing the face of ESBLs in the UK

AU - Livermore, DM

AU - Hawkey, Peter

PY - 2005/1/1

Y1 - 2005/1/1

N2 - The UK has experienced a sudden rise in extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) rates, largely due to the appearance and spread of Escherichia coli producing CTX-M-15 type beta-lactamase. The British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy organized two update meetings during 2004 to report and discuss the recognition, clinical diagnosis, treatment and control of bacteria producing these beta-lactamases. This paper reports the data and reviews made by contributors to the conferences. The historical distribution and emergence of ESBLs was reviewed along with the emergence of plasmid-mediated CTX-M ESBLs following their mobilization from the chromosome of Kluyvera spp. The first significant outbreak of CTX-M producers in the UK occurred in 2001 and involved Klebsiella pneumoniae with CTX-M-26 at one site, but by 2003, cloned and diverse E. coli with CTX-M-15 were widespread, with Shropshire one of the most affected regions. The specific experience in Shropshire was reported on and a comprehensive review made of the level of awareness of the need for ESBL detection in laboratories in England and Wales, together with a description of the variety of methods that may be applied, with recommendations for optimal methodology. The increased mortality associated with inappropriate treatment of infections caused by ESBL-producing strains was highlighted, together with discussion on potential control of cross-infection. The meeting concluded that the CTX-M genes have now become widespread in not only E. coli but other Enterobacteriaceae in the UK and this will represent a substantial threat to both the treatment of infections caused by these bacteria in the community and within hospitals.

AB - The UK has experienced a sudden rise in extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) rates, largely due to the appearance and spread of Escherichia coli producing CTX-M-15 type beta-lactamase. The British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy organized two update meetings during 2004 to report and discuss the recognition, clinical diagnosis, treatment and control of bacteria producing these beta-lactamases. This paper reports the data and reviews made by contributors to the conferences. The historical distribution and emergence of ESBLs was reviewed along with the emergence of plasmid-mediated CTX-M ESBLs following their mobilization from the chromosome of Kluyvera spp. The first significant outbreak of CTX-M producers in the UK occurred in 2001 and involved Klebsiella pneumoniae with CTX-M-26 at one site, but by 2003, cloned and diverse E. coli with CTX-M-15 were widespread, with Shropshire one of the most affected regions. The specific experience in Shropshire was reported on and a comprehensive review made of the level of awareness of the need for ESBL detection in laboratories in England and Wales, together with a description of the variety of methods that may be applied, with recommendations for optimal methodology. The increased mortality associated with inappropriate treatment of infections caused by ESBL-producing strains was highlighted, together with discussion on potential control of cross-infection. The meeting concluded that the CTX-M genes have now become widespread in not only E. coli but other Enterobacteriaceae in the UK and this will represent a substantial threat to both the treatment of infections caused by these bacteria in the community and within hospitals.

KW - extended-spectrum beta-lactamases

KW - ESBLs

KW - BSAC

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=24644495150&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/jac/dki239

DO - 10.1093/jac/dki239

M3 - Article

SP - 451

EP - 454

JO - Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

JF - Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

SN - 0305-7453

ER -