Congenital deficiency of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome): diagnostic value of urinary free cortisol and cortisone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Authors

Colleges, School and Institutes

Abstract

The syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess (AME) is an inherited form of hypertension. This disorder results from an inability of the enzyme 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11beta-OHSD) to inactivate cortisol to cortisone. The diagnosis of AME is usually based on an elevated ratio of cortisol to cortisone reduced metabolites in the urine [tetrahydrocortisol plus allotetrahydrocortisol to tetrahydrocortisone (THF+alloTHF/THE)]. The principal site of "A" ring reduction is the liver, but AME arises from mutation in the gene encoding 11beta-OHSD2 in the kidney. We used a gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric method to measure the urinary free cortisol (UFF) and free cortisone (UFE) in 24 patients affected by the two variants of AME [19 with the classical form (type I) and 5 with the mild form called AME type II] in order to provide a more reproducible in vivo measure of the renal enzymatic activity. Type I patients were divided into two groups: children under 12 and adults. UFF levels (microg/24 h) did not differ between under-12 controls and AME type I children (mean+/-SD, 9+/-4 and 15+/-12, respectively), but was significantly higher in affected adults compared to controls: (62+/-32 vs 29+/-8, p

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-23
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of endocrinological investigation
Volume24
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2001

Keywords

  • cortisone, cortisol, gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry, hypertension, apparent mineralocorticoid syndrome