Colorectal cancer, screening and survival: the influence of socio-economic deprivation

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Colorectal cancer, screening and survival: the influence of socio-economic deprivation. / Frew, Emma; Whynes, DK; Manghan, CM; Scholefield, JH; Hardcastle, JD.

In: Public Health, Vol. 117, No. 6, 01.11.2003, p. 389-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Frew, E, Whynes, DK, Manghan, CM, Scholefield, JH & Hardcastle, JD 2003, 'Colorectal cancer, screening and survival: the influence of socio-economic deprivation', Public Health, vol. 117, no. 6, pp. 389-95. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0033-3506(03)00146-X

APA

Vancouver

Author

Frew, Emma ; Whynes, DK ; Manghan, CM ; Scholefield, JH ; Hardcastle, JD. / Colorectal cancer, screening and survival: the influence of socio-economic deprivation. In: Public Health. 2003 ; Vol. 117, No. 6. pp. 389-95.

Bibtex

@article{df3f4335a81549a88326ccd8ce12b968,
title = "Colorectal cancer, screening and survival: the influence of socio-economic deprivation",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: To determine the extent to which socio-economic deprivation explains colorectal cancer prevalence, subject participation in screening, and postoperative survival and life expectancy. METHODS: Regression analyses of clinical data from a large randomized controlled trial, augmented by geographical-based indices of deprivation. RESULTS: Deprivation appears to exert no significant impact on colorectal cancer prevalence but is a major factor explaining subject participation in screening. Cancer detection at later stages reduces life expectancy at time of treatment. Females from more-deprived areas have poorer post-treatment life expectancies and survival prospects, independently of their screening behaviour. CONCLUSIONS: Screening increases the chances of having a cancer treated at an earlier stage, and treatment at an earlier stage is associated with longer subsequent life expectancy. However, those from more-deprived areas are less likely to accept an invitation to be screened.",
author = "Emma Frew and DK Whynes and CM Manghan and JH Scholefield and JD Hardcastle",
year = "2003",
month = nov
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0033-3506(03)00146-X",
language = "English",
volume = "117",
pages = "389--95",
journal = "Public Health",
issn = "0033-3506",
publisher = "WB Saunders",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Colorectal cancer, screening and survival: the influence of socio-economic deprivation

AU - Frew, Emma

AU - Whynes, DK

AU - Manghan, CM

AU - Scholefield, JH

AU - Hardcastle, JD

PY - 2003/11/1

Y1 - 2003/11/1

N2 - OBJECTIVES: To determine the extent to which socio-economic deprivation explains colorectal cancer prevalence, subject participation in screening, and postoperative survival and life expectancy. METHODS: Regression analyses of clinical data from a large randomized controlled trial, augmented by geographical-based indices of deprivation. RESULTS: Deprivation appears to exert no significant impact on colorectal cancer prevalence but is a major factor explaining subject participation in screening. Cancer detection at later stages reduces life expectancy at time of treatment. Females from more-deprived areas have poorer post-treatment life expectancies and survival prospects, independently of their screening behaviour. CONCLUSIONS: Screening increases the chances of having a cancer treated at an earlier stage, and treatment at an earlier stage is associated with longer subsequent life expectancy. However, those from more-deprived areas are less likely to accept an invitation to be screened.

AB - OBJECTIVES: To determine the extent to which socio-economic deprivation explains colorectal cancer prevalence, subject participation in screening, and postoperative survival and life expectancy. METHODS: Regression analyses of clinical data from a large randomized controlled trial, augmented by geographical-based indices of deprivation. RESULTS: Deprivation appears to exert no significant impact on colorectal cancer prevalence but is a major factor explaining subject participation in screening. Cancer detection at later stages reduces life expectancy at time of treatment. Females from more-deprived areas have poorer post-treatment life expectancies and survival prospects, independently of their screening behaviour. CONCLUSIONS: Screening increases the chances of having a cancer treated at an earlier stage, and treatment at an earlier stage is associated with longer subsequent life expectancy. However, those from more-deprived areas are less likely to accept an invitation to be screened.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0142212262&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0033-3506(03)00146-X

DO - 10.1016/S0033-3506(03)00146-X

M3 - Article

C2 - 14522153

VL - 117

SP - 389

EP - 395

JO - Public Health

JF - Public Health

SN - 0033-3506

IS - 6

ER -