Clinically apparent atherosclerotic disease in diabetes is associated with an increase in platelet microparticle levels

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Authors

Colleges, School and Institutes

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The commonest cause of mortality in patients with Type 2 diabetes is atherothrombosis, which can be related to abnormalities in the coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways, as well as in platelet function. Platelet microparticles (PMPs) may contribute to the prothrombotic state and may promote the progression of atherosclerosis. We hypothesized that PMPs are elevated in Type 2 diabetes and that patients with Type 2 diabetes and clinically apparent atherosclerosis would have the highest levels. Similarly, we hypothesized that soluble plasma P-selectin (sPsel) and CD40L (both molecules which are released by activated platelets), as well as %CD62P (P-selectin) and %CD63 positivity on platelets quantified by flow cytometry, would be highest in patients with Type 2 diabetes and clinically apparent atherosclerotic disease, and might be correlated to PMP levels. METHODS: Venous blood was obtained from 21 Type 2 diabetic patients without atherosclerotic complications, 18 diabetic patients with clinically apparent atherosclerotic disease and 21 non-diabetic control subjects. PMPs, as well as %CD62P and %CD63 positivity on platelets, were quantified by flow cytometry. sPsel and CD40L were measured using ELISA. RESULTS: Patients with Type 2 diabetes and clinically apparent atherosclerotic disease had the highest PMP (P=0.045) and sPsel (P=0.046) levels, compared with patients without complications (who had intermediate PMP levels) and control subjects. Control subjects had the lowest CD40L levels (P

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1657-62
Number of pages6
JournalDiabetic Medicine
Volume22
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2005