Can children resist making interpretations when uncertain?

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Can children resist making interpretations when uncertain? / Beck, Sarah; Robinson, Elizabeth; Freeth, MM.

In: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, Vol. 99, No. 4, 01.04.2008, p. 252-270.

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@article{88a85416f6ea432d93dd270a4b44b5ae,
title = "Can children resist making interpretations when uncertain?",
abstract = "In two experiments, we examined young children's ability to delay a response to ambiguous input. In Experiment 1, 5- and 6-year-olds performed as poorly when they needed to choose between basing an interpretation on ambiguous input and delaying an interpretation as when making explicit evaluations of knowledge, whereas 7- and 8-year-olds found the former task easy. In Experiment 2, 5- and 6-year-olds performed well on a task that required delaying a response but removed the need to decide between strategies. We discuss children's difficulty with ambiguity in terms of the decision-making demands made by different procedures. These demands appear to cause particular problems for young children.",
keywords = "implicit and explicit understanding, knowledge, ambiguity",
author = "Sarah Beck and Elizabeth Robinson and MM Freeth",
year = "2008",
month = apr
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jecp.2007.06.002",
language = "English",
volume = "99",
pages = "252--270",
journal = "Journal of Experimental Child Psychology",
issn = "0022-0965",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Can children resist making interpretations when uncertain?

AU - Beck, Sarah

AU - Robinson, Elizabeth

AU - Freeth, MM

PY - 2008/4/1

Y1 - 2008/4/1

N2 - In two experiments, we examined young children's ability to delay a response to ambiguous input. In Experiment 1, 5- and 6-year-olds performed as poorly when they needed to choose between basing an interpretation on ambiguous input and delaying an interpretation as when making explicit evaluations of knowledge, whereas 7- and 8-year-olds found the former task easy. In Experiment 2, 5- and 6-year-olds performed well on a task that required delaying a response but removed the need to decide between strategies. We discuss children's difficulty with ambiguity in terms of the decision-making demands made by different procedures. These demands appear to cause particular problems for young children.

AB - In two experiments, we examined young children's ability to delay a response to ambiguous input. In Experiment 1, 5- and 6-year-olds performed as poorly when they needed to choose between basing an interpretation on ambiguous input and delaying an interpretation as when making explicit evaluations of knowledge, whereas 7- and 8-year-olds found the former task easy. In Experiment 2, 5- and 6-year-olds performed well on a task that required delaying a response but removed the need to decide between strategies. We discuss children's difficulty with ambiguity in terms of the decision-making demands made by different procedures. These demands appear to cause particular problems for young children.

KW - implicit and explicit understanding

KW - knowledge

KW - ambiguity

U2 - 10.1016/j.jecp.2007.06.002

DO - 10.1016/j.jecp.2007.06.002

M3 - Article

C2 - 17673251

VL - 99

SP - 252

EP - 270

JO - Journal of Experimental Child Psychology

JF - Journal of Experimental Child Psychology

SN - 0022-0965

IS - 4

ER -