Bullying, victimisation, and psychosis

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Bullying, victimisation, and psychosis. / Upthegrove, Rachel.

In: The Lancet Psychiatry, Vol. 2, No. 7, 07.2015, p. 574-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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@article{21db9ee4b3c54ed39b46d36b5460c1cc,
title = "Bullying, victimisation, and psychosis",
abstract = "Trauma is a risk factor for mental illness. This apparently simple statement, with such face validity surely hardly bears investigation. Of course traumatic events will increase the risk of mental distress and disorder- this is stating the obvious. However, not all or perhaps not even the majority of individuals with mental disorder have a history of childhood trauma, and not all individuals who experience childhood trauma develop a mental illness. One could explain this as simply GxE (gene x environment), whereby childhood trauma is the E for a given proportion of patients. Yet despite there being a large body of research to confirm the association between trauma and mental illness, challenges remain. These include the difficulty of recall bias, lack of longitudinal research, varying definitions of trauma and varying assessments of mental illness(1). ",
author = "Rachel Upthegrove",
year = "2015",
month = jul
doi = "10.1016/S2215-0366(15)00176-5",
language = "English",
volume = "2",
pages = "574--6",
journal = "The Lancet Psychiatry",
issn = "2215-0366",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "7",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bullying, victimisation, and psychosis

AU - Upthegrove, Rachel

PY - 2015/7

Y1 - 2015/7

N2 - Trauma is a risk factor for mental illness. This apparently simple statement, with such face validity surely hardly bears investigation. Of course traumatic events will increase the risk of mental distress and disorder- this is stating the obvious. However, not all or perhaps not even the majority of individuals with mental disorder have a history of childhood trauma, and not all individuals who experience childhood trauma develop a mental illness. One could explain this as simply GxE (gene x environment), whereby childhood trauma is the E for a given proportion of patients. Yet despite there being a large body of research to confirm the association between trauma and mental illness, challenges remain. These include the difficulty of recall bias, lack of longitudinal research, varying definitions of trauma and varying assessments of mental illness(1).

AB - Trauma is a risk factor for mental illness. This apparently simple statement, with such face validity surely hardly bears investigation. Of course traumatic events will increase the risk of mental distress and disorder- this is stating the obvious. However, not all or perhaps not even the majority of individuals with mental disorder have a history of childhood trauma, and not all individuals who experience childhood trauma develop a mental illness. One could explain this as simply GxE (gene x environment), whereby childhood trauma is the E for a given proportion of patients. Yet despite there being a large body of research to confirm the association between trauma and mental illness, challenges remain. These include the difficulty of recall bias, lack of longitudinal research, varying definitions of trauma and varying assessments of mental illness(1).

U2 - 10.1016/S2215-0366(15)00176-5

DO - 10.1016/S2215-0366(15)00176-5

M3 - Article

C2 - 26303536

VL - 2

SP - 574

EP - 576

JO - The Lancet Psychiatry

JF - The Lancet Psychiatry

SN - 2215-0366

IS - 7

ER -