Bayes optimality of human perception, action and learning: behavioural and neural evidence

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Colleges, School and Institutes

Abstract

The primary role of any biological nervous system (including the human) is to process incoming information in a way that allows motor choices to be made that increases the subjective utility of the organism. Or put slightly differently, “to make sure good things happen”. There are a number of ways that such a process can be done, but one possible hypothesis is that the human nervous system has been optimized to maximize the use of available resources, thus approximating optimal computations. In the following I will discuss the possibility of the nervous system performing such computations in perception, action and learning, and the behavioural and neural evidence supporting such ideas.

Bibliographic note

Brain-Inspired Computing: Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)

Details

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBrain-Inspired Computing
Subtitle of host publicationLecture Notes in Computer Science
Publication statusPublished - 2014
EventInternational Workshop on Brain-Inspired Computing - Cetraro, Italy
Duration: 8 Jul 201311 Jul 2013

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume8603
ISSN (Print)03029743
ISSN (Electronic)16113349

Conference

ConferenceInternational Workshop on Brain-Inspired Computing
CountryItaly
CityCetraro
Period8/07/1311/07/13

Keywords

  • Bayesian inference, Behaviour, fMRI, Neural recordings, Optimality, Reinforcement learning