Basic science behind the cardiovascular benefits of exercise

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Basic science behind the cardiovascular benefits of exercise. / Wilson, Mathew G.; Ellison, Georgina M.; Cable, N. Tim.

In: Heart, Vol. 101, No. 10, 05.2015, p. 758-765.

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Wilson, Mathew G. ; Ellison, Georgina M. ; Cable, N. Tim. / Basic science behind the cardiovascular benefits of exercise. In: Heart. 2015 ; Vol. 101, No. 10. pp. 758-765.

Bibtex

@article{bfe1a94a5d234bd6ad6e5e013817739a,
title = "Basic science behind the cardiovascular benefits of exercise",
abstract = "Cardiorespiratory fitness is a strong predictor of cardiovascular (CV) disease and all-cause mortality, with increases in cardiorespiratory fitness associated with corresponding decreases in CV disease risk. The effects of exercise upon the myocardium and vascular system are dependent upon the frequency, intensity and duration of the exercise itself. Following a prolonged period (≥ 6 months) of regular intensive exercise in previously untrained individuals, resting and submaximal exercising heart rates are typically 5-20 beats lower, with an increase in stroke volume of ∼20% and enhanced myocardial contractility. Structurally, all four heart chambers increase in volume with mild increases in wall thickness, resulting in greater cardiac mass due to increased myocardial cell size. With this in mind, the present paper aims to review the basic science behind the CV benefits of exercise. Attention will be paid to understanding (1) the relationship between exercise and cardiac remodelling; (2) the cardiac cellular and molecular adaptations in response to exercise, including the examination of molecular mechanisms of physiological cardiac growth and applying these mechanisms to identify new therapeutic targets to prevent or reverse pathological remodelling and heart failure; and (3) vascular adaptations in response to exercise. Finally, this review will briefly examine how to optimise the CV benefits of exercise by considering how much and how intense exercise should be.",
author = "Wilson, {Mathew G.} and Ellison, {Georgina M.} and Cable, {N. Tim}",
year = "2015",
month = may,
doi = "10.1136/heartjnl-2014-306596",
language = "English",
volume = "101",
pages = "758--765",
journal = "Heart",
issn = "1355-6037",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Basic science behind the cardiovascular benefits of exercise

AU - Wilson, Mathew G.

AU - Ellison, Georgina M.

AU - Cable, N. Tim

PY - 2015/5

Y1 - 2015/5

N2 - Cardiorespiratory fitness is a strong predictor of cardiovascular (CV) disease and all-cause mortality, with increases in cardiorespiratory fitness associated with corresponding decreases in CV disease risk. The effects of exercise upon the myocardium and vascular system are dependent upon the frequency, intensity and duration of the exercise itself. Following a prolonged period (≥ 6 months) of regular intensive exercise in previously untrained individuals, resting and submaximal exercising heart rates are typically 5-20 beats lower, with an increase in stroke volume of ∼20% and enhanced myocardial contractility. Structurally, all four heart chambers increase in volume with mild increases in wall thickness, resulting in greater cardiac mass due to increased myocardial cell size. With this in mind, the present paper aims to review the basic science behind the CV benefits of exercise. Attention will be paid to understanding (1) the relationship between exercise and cardiac remodelling; (2) the cardiac cellular and molecular adaptations in response to exercise, including the examination of molecular mechanisms of physiological cardiac growth and applying these mechanisms to identify new therapeutic targets to prevent or reverse pathological remodelling and heart failure; and (3) vascular adaptations in response to exercise. Finally, this review will briefly examine how to optimise the CV benefits of exercise by considering how much and how intense exercise should be.

AB - Cardiorespiratory fitness is a strong predictor of cardiovascular (CV) disease and all-cause mortality, with increases in cardiorespiratory fitness associated with corresponding decreases in CV disease risk. The effects of exercise upon the myocardium and vascular system are dependent upon the frequency, intensity and duration of the exercise itself. Following a prolonged period (≥ 6 months) of regular intensive exercise in previously untrained individuals, resting and submaximal exercising heart rates are typically 5-20 beats lower, with an increase in stroke volume of ∼20% and enhanced myocardial contractility. Structurally, all four heart chambers increase in volume with mild increases in wall thickness, resulting in greater cardiac mass due to increased myocardial cell size. With this in mind, the present paper aims to review the basic science behind the CV benefits of exercise. Attention will be paid to understanding (1) the relationship between exercise and cardiac remodelling; (2) the cardiac cellular and molecular adaptations in response to exercise, including the examination of molecular mechanisms of physiological cardiac growth and applying these mechanisms to identify new therapeutic targets to prevent or reverse pathological remodelling and heart failure; and (3) vascular adaptations in response to exercise. Finally, this review will briefly examine how to optimise the CV benefits of exercise by considering how much and how intense exercise should be.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84930675019&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/heartjnl-2014-306596

DO - 10.1136/heartjnl-2014-306596

M3 - Review article

C2 - 25911667

AN - SCOPUS:84930675019

VL - 101

SP - 758

EP - 765

JO - Heart

JF - Heart

SN - 1355-6037

IS - 10

ER -