Bacteria-instructed synthesis of polymers for self-selective microbial binding and labelling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Bacteria-instructed synthesis of polymers for self-selective microbial binding and labelling. / Magennis, E Peter; Fernandez-Trillo, Francisco; Sui, Cheng; Spain, Sebastian G; Bradshaw, David J; Churchley, David; Mantovani, Giuseppe; Winzer, Klaus; Alexander, Cameron.

In: Nature Materials, Vol. 13, No. 7, 11.05.2014, p. 748-755.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Magennis, EP, Fernandez-Trillo, F, Sui, C, Spain, SG, Bradshaw, DJ, Churchley, D, Mantovani, G, Winzer, K & Alexander, C 2014, 'Bacteria-instructed synthesis of polymers for self-selective microbial binding and labelling', Nature Materials, vol. 13, no. 7, pp. 748-755. https://doi.org/10.1038/nmat3949

APA

Magennis, E. P., Fernandez-Trillo, F., Sui, C., Spain, S. G., Bradshaw, D. J., Churchley, D., Mantovani, G., Winzer, K., & Alexander, C. (2014). Bacteria-instructed synthesis of polymers for self-selective microbial binding and labelling. Nature Materials, 13(7), 748-755. https://doi.org/10.1038/nmat3949

Vancouver

Author

Magennis, E Peter ; Fernandez-Trillo, Francisco ; Sui, Cheng ; Spain, Sebastian G ; Bradshaw, David J ; Churchley, David ; Mantovani, Giuseppe ; Winzer, Klaus ; Alexander, Cameron. / Bacteria-instructed synthesis of polymers for self-selective microbial binding and labelling. In: Nature Materials. 2014 ; Vol. 13, No. 7. pp. 748-755.

Bibtex

@article{49edfc9d70644d87a5a8e7220cb5c206,
title = "Bacteria-instructed synthesis of polymers for self-selective microbial binding and labelling",
abstract = "The detection and inactivation of pathogenic strains of bacteria continues to be an important therapeutic goal. Hence, there is a need for materials that can bind selectively to specific microorganisms for diagnostic or anti-infective applications, but that can be formed from simple and inexpensive building blocks. Here, we exploit bacterial redox systems to induce a copper-mediated radical polymerization of synthetic monomers at cell surfaces, generating polymers in situ that bind strongly to the microorganisms that produced them. This 'bacteria-instructed synthesis' can be carried out with a variety of microbial strains, and we show that the polymers produced are self-selective binding agents for the 'instructing' cell types. We further expand on the bacterial redox chemistries to 'click' fluorescent reporters onto polymers directly at the surfaces of a range of clinical isolate strains, allowing rapid, facile and simultaneous binding and visualization of pathogens.",
author = "Magennis, {E Peter} and Francisco Fernandez-Trillo and Cheng Sui and Spain, {Sebastian G} and Bradshaw, {David J} and David Churchley and Giuseppe Mantovani and Klaus Winzer and Cameron Alexander",
year = "2014",
month = may,
day = "11",
doi = "10.1038/nmat3949",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "748--755",
journal = "Nature Materials",
issn = "1476-1122",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "7",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bacteria-instructed synthesis of polymers for self-selective microbial binding and labelling

AU - Magennis, E Peter

AU - Fernandez-Trillo, Francisco

AU - Sui, Cheng

AU - Spain, Sebastian G

AU - Bradshaw, David J

AU - Churchley, David

AU - Mantovani, Giuseppe

AU - Winzer, Klaus

AU - Alexander, Cameron

PY - 2014/5/11

Y1 - 2014/5/11

N2 - The detection and inactivation of pathogenic strains of bacteria continues to be an important therapeutic goal. Hence, there is a need for materials that can bind selectively to specific microorganisms for diagnostic or anti-infective applications, but that can be formed from simple and inexpensive building blocks. Here, we exploit bacterial redox systems to induce a copper-mediated radical polymerization of synthetic monomers at cell surfaces, generating polymers in situ that bind strongly to the microorganisms that produced them. This 'bacteria-instructed synthesis' can be carried out with a variety of microbial strains, and we show that the polymers produced are self-selective binding agents for the 'instructing' cell types. We further expand on the bacterial redox chemistries to 'click' fluorescent reporters onto polymers directly at the surfaces of a range of clinical isolate strains, allowing rapid, facile and simultaneous binding and visualization of pathogens.

AB - The detection and inactivation of pathogenic strains of bacteria continues to be an important therapeutic goal. Hence, there is a need for materials that can bind selectively to specific microorganisms for diagnostic or anti-infective applications, but that can be formed from simple and inexpensive building blocks. Here, we exploit bacterial redox systems to induce a copper-mediated radical polymerization of synthetic monomers at cell surfaces, generating polymers in situ that bind strongly to the microorganisms that produced them. This 'bacteria-instructed synthesis' can be carried out with a variety of microbial strains, and we show that the polymers produced are self-selective binding agents for the 'instructing' cell types. We further expand on the bacterial redox chemistries to 'click' fluorescent reporters onto polymers directly at the surfaces of a range of clinical isolate strains, allowing rapid, facile and simultaneous binding and visualization of pathogens.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84899771763&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4286827/

U2 - 10.1038/nmat3949

DO - 10.1038/nmat3949

M3 - Article

C2 - 24813421

VL - 13

SP - 748

EP - 755

JO - Nature Materials

JF - Nature Materials

SN - 1476-1122

IS - 7

ER -