Atypical social modulation of imitation in autism spectrum conditions

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Atypical social modulation of imitation in autism spectrum conditions. / Cook, Jennifer L; Bird, Geoffrey.

In: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, Vol. 42, No. 6, 06.2012, p. 1045-51.

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@article{85fa34ad21f74f61b3c81680e9fc6989,
title = "Atypical social modulation of imitation in autism spectrum conditions",
abstract = "Appropriate modulation of imitation according to social context is important for successful social interaction. In the present study we subliminally primed high-functioning adults with ASC and age- and IQ-matched controls with either a pro- or non- social attitude. Following priming, an automatic imitation paradigm was used to acquire an index of imitation. Whereas imitation levels were higher for pro-socially primed relative to non-socially primed control participants, there was no difference between pro- and non- socially primed individuals with ASC. We conclude that high-functioning adults with ASC demonstrate atypical social modulation of imitation. Given the importance of imitation in social interaction we speculate that difficulties with the modulation of imitation may contribute to the social problems characteristic of ASC.",
keywords = "Adult, Child, Child Development Disorders, Pervasive, Female, Humans, Imitative Behavior, Male, Middle Aged, Mirror Neurons, Reaction Time, Social Behavior",
author = "Cook, {Jennifer L} and Geoffrey Bird",
year = "2012",
month = jun,
doi = "10.1007/s10803-011-1341-7",
language = "English",
volume = "42",
pages = "1045--51",
journal = "Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders",
issn = "0162-3257",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Atypical social modulation of imitation in autism spectrum conditions

AU - Cook, Jennifer L

AU - Bird, Geoffrey

PY - 2012/6

Y1 - 2012/6

N2 - Appropriate modulation of imitation according to social context is important for successful social interaction. In the present study we subliminally primed high-functioning adults with ASC and age- and IQ-matched controls with either a pro- or non- social attitude. Following priming, an automatic imitation paradigm was used to acquire an index of imitation. Whereas imitation levels were higher for pro-socially primed relative to non-socially primed control participants, there was no difference between pro- and non- socially primed individuals with ASC. We conclude that high-functioning adults with ASC demonstrate atypical social modulation of imitation. Given the importance of imitation in social interaction we speculate that difficulties with the modulation of imitation may contribute to the social problems characteristic of ASC.

AB - Appropriate modulation of imitation according to social context is important for successful social interaction. In the present study we subliminally primed high-functioning adults with ASC and age- and IQ-matched controls with either a pro- or non- social attitude. Following priming, an automatic imitation paradigm was used to acquire an index of imitation. Whereas imitation levels were higher for pro-socially primed relative to non-socially primed control participants, there was no difference between pro- and non- socially primed individuals with ASC. We conclude that high-functioning adults with ASC demonstrate atypical social modulation of imitation. Given the importance of imitation in social interaction we speculate that difficulties with the modulation of imitation may contribute to the social problems characteristic of ASC.

KW - Adult

KW - Child

KW - Child Development Disorders, Pervasive

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Imitative Behavior

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Mirror Neurons

KW - Reaction Time

KW - Social Behavior

U2 - 10.1007/s10803-011-1341-7

DO - 10.1007/s10803-011-1341-7

M3 - Article

C2 - 21833823

VL - 42

SP - 1045

EP - 1051

JO - Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

JF - Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

SN - 0162-3257

IS - 6

ER -