Attention training in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder improves academic performance: a double-blind pilot application of the computerized progressive attentional training program

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Attention training in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder improves academic performance : a double-blind pilot application of the computerized progressive attentional training program. / Muller Spaniol, Mayra; Mevorach, Carmel; Shalev, Lilach; Cristina T. V. Teixeira, Maria; Lowenthal, Rosane ; Silvestre de Paula, Cristiane .

In: Autism Research, 05.07.2021.

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@article{ec19c4c020a1414d941e0ce445edee44,
title = "Attention training in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder improves academic performance: a double-blind pilot application of the computerized progressive attentional training program",
abstract = "Atypical attention has been reported in individuals with ASD with studies pointing to an increase in ADHD-like symptomatology. Individuals with ASD may also present academic difficulties and it is possible that they face a double-barrier for academic attainment from both core ASD symptomatology and from attention atypicalities, which are directly linked to academic performance. This raises the possibility that academic difficulties in ASD may benefit from cognitive training targeting attention. To test this possibility, we used the CPAT intervention in a double-blind, active control with follow-up intervention study in Brazil. The CPAT is a computerised attention training program that was recently piloted with schoolchildren with ASD in the UK. 26 participants (8 to 14 years) with ASD in the S{\~a}o Paulo{\textquoteright}s ASD Reference Unit were assigned to either the CPAT (n=14) or active control group (n=12), which were matched at baseline. Two 45-minutes intervention sessions per week were conducted over a 2-month period. School performance, attention, fluid intelligence and behavior were assessed before, immediately after and 3 months following the intervention. Significant group by time interactions show improvements in math, reading, writing and attention that were maintained at follow-up for the CPAT (but not the active control) group, while parents of children from both groups tended to report behavioural improvements. We conclude that attention training has the potential to reduce obstacles for academic attainment in ASD. Combined with the previous pilot study, the current results point to the generality of the approach, which leads to similar outcomes in different cultural and social contexts.",
author = "{Muller Spaniol}, Mayra and Carmel Mevorach and Lilach Shalev and {Cristina T. V. Teixeira}, Maria and Rosane Lowenthal and {Silvestre de Paula}, Cristiane",
year = "2021",
month = jul,
day = "5",
doi = "10.1002/aur.2566",
language = "English",
journal = "Autism Research",
issn = "1939-3806",
publisher = "John Wiley & Sons",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Attention training in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder improves academic performance

T2 - a double-blind pilot application of the computerized progressive attentional training program

AU - Muller Spaniol, Mayra

AU - Mevorach, Carmel

AU - Shalev, Lilach

AU - Cristina T. V. Teixeira, Maria

AU - Lowenthal, Rosane

AU - Silvestre de Paula, Cristiane

PY - 2021/7/5

Y1 - 2021/7/5

N2 - Atypical attention has been reported in individuals with ASD with studies pointing to an increase in ADHD-like symptomatology. Individuals with ASD may also present academic difficulties and it is possible that they face a double-barrier for academic attainment from both core ASD symptomatology and from attention atypicalities, which are directly linked to academic performance. This raises the possibility that academic difficulties in ASD may benefit from cognitive training targeting attention. To test this possibility, we used the CPAT intervention in a double-blind, active control with follow-up intervention study in Brazil. The CPAT is a computerised attention training program that was recently piloted with schoolchildren with ASD in the UK. 26 participants (8 to 14 years) with ASD in the São Paulo’s ASD Reference Unit were assigned to either the CPAT (n=14) or active control group (n=12), which were matched at baseline. Two 45-minutes intervention sessions per week were conducted over a 2-month period. School performance, attention, fluid intelligence and behavior were assessed before, immediately after and 3 months following the intervention. Significant group by time interactions show improvements in math, reading, writing and attention that were maintained at follow-up for the CPAT (but not the active control) group, while parents of children from both groups tended to report behavioural improvements. We conclude that attention training has the potential to reduce obstacles for academic attainment in ASD. Combined with the previous pilot study, the current results point to the generality of the approach, which leads to similar outcomes in different cultural and social contexts.

AB - Atypical attention has been reported in individuals with ASD with studies pointing to an increase in ADHD-like symptomatology. Individuals with ASD may also present academic difficulties and it is possible that they face a double-barrier for academic attainment from both core ASD symptomatology and from attention atypicalities, which are directly linked to academic performance. This raises the possibility that academic difficulties in ASD may benefit from cognitive training targeting attention. To test this possibility, we used the CPAT intervention in a double-blind, active control with follow-up intervention study in Brazil. The CPAT is a computerised attention training program that was recently piloted with schoolchildren with ASD in the UK. 26 participants (8 to 14 years) with ASD in the São Paulo’s ASD Reference Unit were assigned to either the CPAT (n=14) or active control group (n=12), which were matched at baseline. Two 45-minutes intervention sessions per week were conducted over a 2-month period. School performance, attention, fluid intelligence and behavior were assessed before, immediately after and 3 months following the intervention. Significant group by time interactions show improvements in math, reading, writing and attention that were maintained at follow-up for the CPAT (but not the active control) group, while parents of children from both groups tended to report behavioural improvements. We conclude that attention training has the potential to reduce obstacles for academic attainment in ASD. Combined with the previous pilot study, the current results point to the generality of the approach, which leads to similar outcomes in different cultural and social contexts.

U2 - 10.1002/aur.2566

DO - 10.1002/aur.2566

M3 - Article

C2 - 34227246

JO - Autism Research

JF - Autism Research

SN - 1939-3806

ER -