An analytical Micro CT methodology for quantifying inorganic dentine debris following internal tooth preparation

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@article{9dd077f406dd435e9ee70fa8d03f6b33,
title = "An analytical Micro CT methodology for quantifying inorganic dentine debris following internal tooth preparation",
abstract = "ObjectivesMicroCT allows the complex canal network of teeth to be mapped but does not readily distinguish between structural tissue (dentine) and the debris generated during cleaning. The aim was to introduce a validated approach for identifying debris following routine instrumentation and disinfection.MethodsThe mesial canals of 12 mandibular molars were instrumented, and irrigated with EDTA and NaOCl. MicroCT images before and after instrumentation and images were assessed qualitatively and quantitatively.ResultsDebris in the canal space was identified through morphological image analysis and superimposition of the images before and after instrumentation. This revealed that the removal of debris is prohibited by protrusions and micro-canals within the tooth creating areas which are inaccessible to the irrigant. Although the results arising from the analytical methodology did provide measurements of debris produced, biological differences in the canals resulted in variances. Both irrigants reduced debris compared to the control which decreased with EDTA and further with NaOCl. However, anatomical variation did not allow definitive conclusions on which irrigant was best to use although both reduced debris build up.ConclusionsThis work presents a new approach for distinguishing between debris and structural inorganic tissue in root canals of teeth. The application may prove useful in other calcified tissue shape determination.Clinical significanceRemaining debris may contain bacteria and obstruct the flow of irrigating solutions into lateral canal anatomy. This new approach for detecting the amount of remaining debris in canal systems following instrumentation provides a clearer methodology of the identification of such debris.",
keywords = "X-ray microtomography, Debris, Root canal preparation, Calibration, Dentine algorithms",
author = "Robinson, {Jonathan P} and Lumley, {Philip J} and Elzbieta Claridge and Paul Cooper and Grover, {Liam M} and Richard Williams and Anthony Walmsley and Elzbieta Claridge",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
year = "2012",
month = nov,
doi = "10.1016/j.jdent.2012.08.007",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "999--1005",
journal = "Journal of Dentistry",
issn = "0300-5712",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "11",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - An analytical Micro CT methodology for quantifying inorganic dentine debris following internal tooth preparation

AU - Robinson, Jonathan P

AU - Lumley, Philip J

AU - Claridge, Elzbieta

AU - Cooper, Paul

AU - Grover, Liam M

AU - Williams, Richard

AU - Walmsley, Anthony

AU - Claridge, Elzbieta

N1 - Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2012/11

Y1 - 2012/11

N2 - ObjectivesMicroCT allows the complex canal network of teeth to be mapped but does not readily distinguish between structural tissue (dentine) and the debris generated during cleaning. The aim was to introduce a validated approach for identifying debris following routine instrumentation and disinfection.MethodsThe mesial canals of 12 mandibular molars were instrumented, and irrigated with EDTA and NaOCl. MicroCT images before and after instrumentation and images were assessed qualitatively and quantitatively.ResultsDebris in the canal space was identified through morphological image analysis and superimposition of the images before and after instrumentation. This revealed that the removal of debris is prohibited by protrusions and micro-canals within the tooth creating areas which are inaccessible to the irrigant. Although the results arising from the analytical methodology did provide measurements of debris produced, biological differences in the canals resulted in variances. Both irrigants reduced debris compared to the control which decreased with EDTA and further with NaOCl. However, anatomical variation did not allow definitive conclusions on which irrigant was best to use although both reduced debris build up.ConclusionsThis work presents a new approach for distinguishing between debris and structural inorganic tissue in root canals of teeth. The application may prove useful in other calcified tissue shape determination.Clinical significanceRemaining debris may contain bacteria and obstruct the flow of irrigating solutions into lateral canal anatomy. This new approach for detecting the amount of remaining debris in canal systems following instrumentation provides a clearer methodology of the identification of such debris.

AB - ObjectivesMicroCT allows the complex canal network of teeth to be mapped but does not readily distinguish between structural tissue (dentine) and the debris generated during cleaning. The aim was to introduce a validated approach for identifying debris following routine instrumentation and disinfection.MethodsThe mesial canals of 12 mandibular molars were instrumented, and irrigated with EDTA and NaOCl. MicroCT images before and after instrumentation and images were assessed qualitatively and quantitatively.ResultsDebris in the canal space was identified through morphological image analysis and superimposition of the images before and after instrumentation. This revealed that the removal of debris is prohibited by protrusions and micro-canals within the tooth creating areas which are inaccessible to the irrigant. Although the results arising from the analytical methodology did provide measurements of debris produced, biological differences in the canals resulted in variances. Both irrigants reduced debris compared to the control which decreased with EDTA and further with NaOCl. However, anatomical variation did not allow definitive conclusions on which irrigant was best to use although both reduced debris build up.ConclusionsThis work presents a new approach for distinguishing between debris and structural inorganic tissue in root canals of teeth. The application may prove useful in other calcified tissue shape determination.Clinical significanceRemaining debris may contain bacteria and obstruct the flow of irrigating solutions into lateral canal anatomy. This new approach for detecting the amount of remaining debris in canal systems following instrumentation provides a clearer methodology of the identification of such debris.

KW - X-ray microtomography

KW - Debris

KW - Root canal preparation

KW - Calibration

KW - Dentine algorithms

U2 - 10.1016/j.jdent.2012.08.007

DO - 10.1016/j.jdent.2012.08.007

M3 - Article

C2 - 22922224

VL - 40

SP - 999

EP - 1005

JO - Journal of Dentistry

JF - Journal of Dentistry

SN - 0300-5712

IS - 11

ER -