An acute exposure to intermittent negative airway pressure elicits respiratory long-term facilitation in awake humans

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An acute exposure to intermittent negative airway pressure elicits respiratory long-term facilitation in awake humans. / Griffin, Harry; Al Humoud, Shoug Yousef Y; Benson, Joshua; Cooper, Brendan; Coomaraswamy, Kristian; Balanos, George.

In: Respiratory physiology & neurobiology, Vol. 267, 01.09.2019, p. 20-26.

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@article{291a2f66e6f64db2b54f912ddd9f9da6,
title = "An acute exposure to intermittent negative airway pressure elicits respiratory long-term facilitation in awake humans",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: A sustained elevation in respiratory drive following removal of the inducing stimulus is known as respiratory long-term facilitation (rLTF). We investigated whether an acute exposure to intermittent negative airway pressure (INAP) elicits rLTF in humans.METHOD: 13 healthy males (20.9 ± 2.8 years) undertook two trials (INAP and Control). In the INAP trial participants were exposed to one hour of 30-second episodes of breathing against negative pressure (-10 cmH2O) interspersed by 60-second intervals of breathing at atmospheric pressure. In the Control trial participants breathed at atmospheric pressure for one hour. Ventilation following INAP (recovery phase) was compared to that during baseline.RESULTS: Ventilation increased from baseline to recovery in the INAP trial (14.9 ± 0.9 vs 19.1 ± 0.7 L/min, P = 0.002). This increase was significantly greater than the equivalent during the Control trial (P = 0.019). Data shown as mean ± SEM.CONCLUSION: In this study INAP elicited rLTF in awake, healthy humans. Further research is required to investigate the responsible mechanisms.",
keywords = "Intermittent negative airway pressure, Long-term facilitation",
author = "Harry Griffin and {Al Humoud}, {Shoug Yousef Y} and Joshua Benson and Brendan Cooper and Kristian Coomaraswamy and George Balanos",
year = "2019",
month = sep,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.resp.2019.05.016",
language = "English",
volume = "267",
pages = "20--26",
journal = "Respiratory physiology & neurobiology",
issn = "1569-9048",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - An acute exposure to intermittent negative airway pressure elicits respiratory long-term facilitation in awake humans

AU - Griffin, Harry

AU - Al Humoud, Shoug Yousef Y

AU - Benson, Joshua

AU - Cooper, Brendan

AU - Coomaraswamy, Kristian

AU - Balanos, George

PY - 2019/9/1

Y1 - 2019/9/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: A sustained elevation in respiratory drive following removal of the inducing stimulus is known as respiratory long-term facilitation (rLTF). We investigated whether an acute exposure to intermittent negative airway pressure (INAP) elicits rLTF in humans.METHOD: 13 healthy males (20.9 ± 2.8 years) undertook two trials (INAP and Control). In the INAP trial participants were exposed to one hour of 30-second episodes of breathing against negative pressure (-10 cmH2O) interspersed by 60-second intervals of breathing at atmospheric pressure. In the Control trial participants breathed at atmospheric pressure for one hour. Ventilation following INAP (recovery phase) was compared to that during baseline.RESULTS: Ventilation increased from baseline to recovery in the INAP trial (14.9 ± 0.9 vs 19.1 ± 0.7 L/min, P = 0.002). This increase was significantly greater than the equivalent during the Control trial (P = 0.019). Data shown as mean ± SEM.CONCLUSION: In this study INAP elicited rLTF in awake, healthy humans. Further research is required to investigate the responsible mechanisms.

AB - BACKGROUND: A sustained elevation in respiratory drive following removal of the inducing stimulus is known as respiratory long-term facilitation (rLTF). We investigated whether an acute exposure to intermittent negative airway pressure (INAP) elicits rLTF in humans.METHOD: 13 healthy males (20.9 ± 2.8 years) undertook two trials (INAP and Control). In the INAP trial participants were exposed to one hour of 30-second episodes of breathing against negative pressure (-10 cmH2O) interspersed by 60-second intervals of breathing at atmospheric pressure. In the Control trial participants breathed at atmospheric pressure for one hour. Ventilation following INAP (recovery phase) was compared to that during baseline.RESULTS: Ventilation increased from baseline to recovery in the INAP trial (14.9 ± 0.9 vs 19.1 ± 0.7 L/min, P = 0.002). This increase was significantly greater than the equivalent during the Control trial (P = 0.019). Data shown as mean ± SEM.CONCLUSION: In this study INAP elicited rLTF in awake, healthy humans. Further research is required to investigate the responsible mechanisms.

KW - Intermittent negative airway pressure

KW - Long-term facilitation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85067208668&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.resp.2019.05.016

DO - 10.1016/j.resp.2019.05.016

M3 - Article

VL - 267

SP - 20

EP - 26

JO - Respiratory physiology & neurobiology

JF - Respiratory physiology & neurobiology

SN - 1569-9048

ER -