Amount, source and pattern of dietary protein Intake across the adult lifespan: a cross-sectional study

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@article{d4d24805529a49538a2d4752ee4cdcd6,
title = "Amount, source and pattern of dietary protein Intake across the adult lifespan: a cross-sectional study",
abstract = "Objectives: Sub-optimal dietary protein consumption may partially underlie the age-related loss of muscle mass and function (sarcopenia). Specifically, dose, timing, source and distribution of dietary protein across the day might influence muscle anabolism in individuals from across the lifespan.Design: The present study aimed to assess daily and meal-specific protein intake, protein source and protein intake pattern in 40 young (23.8 ± 4.3 years), 40 middle-aged (51.6 ± 4.1 years), and 40 old (77.4 ± 7.4 years) individuals using 3-day weighed food diaries.Results: Old individuals consumed on average 83.4 ± 24.6 g of daily protein, which was significantly lower compared with young but not middle-aged individuals who consumed, respectively, 105.1 ± 43.0 g and 97.0 ± 31.1 g of daily protein (P = 0.013). No significant difference in daily protein intake was found with middle-aged individuals. Dietary protein intake pattern was uneven across meals for all groups (P < 0.001 for all). Sources of protein consumption were similar between groups except at lunch where old individuals ingested lower quality proteins compared with middle aged and young individuals.Conclusion: Although total daily protein intake was sufficient in the majority of participants, per-meal protein intake and protein distribution contend the current knowledge regarding optimal protein intakes. Increasing protein intake, especially at breakfast and lunch, could mitigate age-related muscle loss.",
keywords = "aging, nutrition, protein, sarcopenia, skeletal muscle",
author = "Benoit Smeuninx and Greig, {Carolyn A} and Leigh Breen",
year = "2020",
month = mar,
day = "16",
doi = "10.3389/fnut.2020.00025",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "1--9",
journal = "Frontiers in Nutrition",
issn = "2296-861X",
publisher = "Frontiers Research Foundation",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Amount, source and pattern of dietary protein Intake across the adult lifespan

T2 - a cross-sectional study

AU - Smeuninx, Benoit

AU - Greig, Carolyn A

AU - Breen, Leigh

PY - 2020/3/16

Y1 - 2020/3/16

N2 - Objectives: Sub-optimal dietary protein consumption may partially underlie the age-related loss of muscle mass and function (sarcopenia). Specifically, dose, timing, source and distribution of dietary protein across the day might influence muscle anabolism in individuals from across the lifespan.Design: The present study aimed to assess daily and meal-specific protein intake, protein source and protein intake pattern in 40 young (23.8 ± 4.3 years), 40 middle-aged (51.6 ± 4.1 years), and 40 old (77.4 ± 7.4 years) individuals using 3-day weighed food diaries.Results: Old individuals consumed on average 83.4 ± 24.6 g of daily protein, which was significantly lower compared with young but not middle-aged individuals who consumed, respectively, 105.1 ± 43.0 g and 97.0 ± 31.1 g of daily protein (P = 0.013). No significant difference in daily protein intake was found with middle-aged individuals. Dietary protein intake pattern was uneven across meals for all groups (P < 0.001 for all). Sources of protein consumption were similar between groups except at lunch where old individuals ingested lower quality proteins compared with middle aged and young individuals.Conclusion: Although total daily protein intake was sufficient in the majority of participants, per-meal protein intake and protein distribution contend the current knowledge regarding optimal protein intakes. Increasing protein intake, especially at breakfast and lunch, could mitigate age-related muscle loss.

AB - Objectives: Sub-optimal dietary protein consumption may partially underlie the age-related loss of muscle mass and function (sarcopenia). Specifically, dose, timing, source and distribution of dietary protein across the day might influence muscle anabolism in individuals from across the lifespan.Design: The present study aimed to assess daily and meal-specific protein intake, protein source and protein intake pattern in 40 young (23.8 ± 4.3 years), 40 middle-aged (51.6 ± 4.1 years), and 40 old (77.4 ± 7.4 years) individuals using 3-day weighed food diaries.Results: Old individuals consumed on average 83.4 ± 24.6 g of daily protein, which was significantly lower compared with young but not middle-aged individuals who consumed, respectively, 105.1 ± 43.0 g and 97.0 ± 31.1 g of daily protein (P = 0.013). No significant difference in daily protein intake was found with middle-aged individuals. Dietary protein intake pattern was uneven across meals for all groups (P < 0.001 for all). Sources of protein consumption were similar between groups except at lunch where old individuals ingested lower quality proteins compared with middle aged and young individuals.Conclusion: Although total daily protein intake was sufficient in the majority of participants, per-meal protein intake and protein distribution contend the current knowledge regarding optimal protein intakes. Increasing protein intake, especially at breakfast and lunch, could mitigate age-related muscle loss.

KW - aging

KW - nutrition

KW - protein

KW - sarcopenia

KW - skeletal muscle

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85082667356&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3389/fnut.2020.00025

DO - 10.3389/fnut.2020.00025

M3 - Article

C2 - 32232047

VL - 7

SP - 1

EP - 9

JO - Frontiers in Nutrition

JF - Frontiers in Nutrition

SN - 2296-861X

M1 - 25

ER -