Alpha/beta power decreases track the fidelity of stimulus-specific information

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Alpha/beta power decreases track the fidelity of stimulus-specific information. / Griffiths, Benjamin James; Mayhew, Stephen D; Mullinger, Karen J; Jorge, João; Charest, Ian; Wimber, Maria; Hanslmayr, Simon.

In: Elife, Vol. 8, e49562, 29.11.2019.

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@article{e45f57152f3a4e8a81fb61dfc4735ab7,
title = "Alpha/beta power decreases track the fidelity of stimulus-specific information",
abstract = "Massed synchronised neuronal firing is detrimental to information processing. When networks of task-irrelevant neurons fire in unison, they mask the signal generated by task-critical neurons. On a macroscopic level, such synchronisation can contribute to alpha/beta (8-30Hz) oscillations. Reducing the amplitude of these oscillations, therefore, may enhance information processing. Here, we test this hypothesis. Twenty-one participants completed an associative memory task while undergoing simultaneous EEG-fMRI recordings. Using representational similarity analysis, we quantified the amount of stimulus-specific information represented within the BOLD signal on every trial. When correlating this metric with concurrently-recorded alpha/beta power, we found a significant negative correlation which indicated that as post-stimulus alpha/beta power decreased, stimulus-specific information increased. Critically, we found this effect in three unique tasks: visual perception, auditory perception, and visual memory retrieval, indicating that this phenomenon transcends both stimulus modality and cognitive task. These results indicate that alpha/beta power decreases parametrically track the fidelity of both externally-presented and internally-generated stimulus-specific information represented within the cortex.",
keywords = "EEG, episodic memory, fMRI, human, neural oscillations, neuroscience, perception",
author = "Griffiths, {Benjamin James} and Mayhew, {Stephen D} and Mullinger, {Karen J} and Jo{\~a}o Jorge and Ian Charest and Maria Wimber and Simon Hanslmayr",
year = "2019",
month = nov
day = "29",
doi = "10.7554/eLife.49562",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "Elife",
issn = "2050-084X",
publisher = "eLife Sciences Publications",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Alpha/beta power decreases track the fidelity of stimulus-specific information

AU - Griffiths, Benjamin James

AU - Mayhew, Stephen D

AU - Mullinger, Karen J

AU - Jorge, João

AU - Charest, Ian

AU - Wimber, Maria

AU - Hanslmayr, Simon

PY - 2019/11/29

Y1 - 2019/11/29

N2 - Massed synchronised neuronal firing is detrimental to information processing. When networks of task-irrelevant neurons fire in unison, they mask the signal generated by task-critical neurons. On a macroscopic level, such synchronisation can contribute to alpha/beta (8-30Hz) oscillations. Reducing the amplitude of these oscillations, therefore, may enhance information processing. Here, we test this hypothesis. Twenty-one participants completed an associative memory task while undergoing simultaneous EEG-fMRI recordings. Using representational similarity analysis, we quantified the amount of stimulus-specific information represented within the BOLD signal on every trial. When correlating this metric with concurrently-recorded alpha/beta power, we found a significant negative correlation which indicated that as post-stimulus alpha/beta power decreased, stimulus-specific information increased. Critically, we found this effect in three unique tasks: visual perception, auditory perception, and visual memory retrieval, indicating that this phenomenon transcends both stimulus modality and cognitive task. These results indicate that alpha/beta power decreases parametrically track the fidelity of both externally-presented and internally-generated stimulus-specific information represented within the cortex.

AB - Massed synchronised neuronal firing is detrimental to information processing. When networks of task-irrelevant neurons fire in unison, they mask the signal generated by task-critical neurons. On a macroscopic level, such synchronisation can contribute to alpha/beta (8-30Hz) oscillations. Reducing the amplitude of these oscillations, therefore, may enhance information processing. Here, we test this hypothesis. Twenty-one participants completed an associative memory task while undergoing simultaneous EEG-fMRI recordings. Using representational similarity analysis, we quantified the amount of stimulus-specific information represented within the BOLD signal on every trial. When correlating this metric with concurrently-recorded alpha/beta power, we found a significant negative correlation which indicated that as post-stimulus alpha/beta power decreased, stimulus-specific information increased. Critically, we found this effect in three unique tasks: visual perception, auditory perception, and visual memory retrieval, indicating that this phenomenon transcends both stimulus modality and cognitive task. These results indicate that alpha/beta power decreases parametrically track the fidelity of both externally-presented and internally-generated stimulus-specific information represented within the cortex.

KW - EEG

KW - episodic memory

KW - fMRI

KW - human

KW - neural oscillations

KW - neuroscience

KW - perception

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85076386568&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.7554/eLife.49562

DO - 10.7554/eLife.49562

M3 - Article

C2 - 31782730

VL - 8

JO - Elife

JF - Elife

SN - 2050-084X

M1 - e49562

ER -