Almost thinking counterfactually: children's understanding of close counterfactuals

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Almost thinking counterfactually: children's understanding of close counterfactuals. / Beck, Sarah; Guthrie, C.

In: Child Development, Vol. 82, No. 4, 01.07.2011, p. 1189-1198.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{a474c0b231ff4fab9338a8c9610e3320,
title = "Almost thinking counterfactually: children's understanding of close counterfactuals",
abstract = "Saying something {"}almost happened{"} indicates that one is considering a close counterfactual world. Previous evidence suggested that children start to consider these close counterfactuals at around 2 years of age (P. L. Harris, 1997), substantially earlier than they pass other tests of counterfactual thinking. However, this success appears to result from false positives. In Experiment 1 (N = 41), 3- and 4-year-olds could identify a character who almost completed an action when the comparison did not complete it. However, in Experiments 1 and 2 (N = 98), children performed poorly when the comparison character completed the action. In Experiment 3 (N = 28), 5- and 6-year-olds consistently passed the task, indicating that they made appropriate counterfactual interpretations of the {"}almost{"} statements. This understanding of close counterfactuals proved more difficult than standard counterfactuals.",
author = "Sarah Beck and C Guthrie",
year = "2011",
month = jul,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1467-8624.2011.01590.x",
language = "English",
volume = "82",
pages = "1189--1198",
journal = "Child Development",
issn = "0009-3920",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Almost thinking counterfactually: children's understanding of close counterfactuals

AU - Beck, Sarah

AU - Guthrie, C

PY - 2011/7/1

Y1 - 2011/7/1

N2 - Saying something "almost happened" indicates that one is considering a close counterfactual world. Previous evidence suggested that children start to consider these close counterfactuals at around 2 years of age (P. L. Harris, 1997), substantially earlier than they pass other tests of counterfactual thinking. However, this success appears to result from false positives. In Experiment 1 (N = 41), 3- and 4-year-olds could identify a character who almost completed an action when the comparison did not complete it. However, in Experiments 1 and 2 (N = 98), children performed poorly when the comparison character completed the action. In Experiment 3 (N = 28), 5- and 6-year-olds consistently passed the task, indicating that they made appropriate counterfactual interpretations of the "almost" statements. This understanding of close counterfactuals proved more difficult than standard counterfactuals.

AB - Saying something "almost happened" indicates that one is considering a close counterfactual world. Previous evidence suggested that children start to consider these close counterfactuals at around 2 years of age (P. L. Harris, 1997), substantially earlier than they pass other tests of counterfactual thinking. However, this success appears to result from false positives. In Experiment 1 (N = 41), 3- and 4-year-olds could identify a character who almost completed an action when the comparison did not complete it. However, in Experiments 1 and 2 (N = 98), children performed poorly when the comparison character completed the action. In Experiment 3 (N = 28), 5- and 6-year-olds consistently passed the task, indicating that they made appropriate counterfactual interpretations of the "almost" statements. This understanding of close counterfactuals proved more difficult than standard counterfactuals.

U2 - 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2011.01590.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2011.01590.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 21466543

VL - 82

SP - 1189

EP - 1198

JO - Child Development

JF - Child Development

SN - 0009-3920

IS - 4

ER -