Acknowledging awareness: informing families of individual research results for patients in the vegetative state

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Acknowledging awareness : informing families of individual research results for patients in the vegetative state. / Graham, Mackenzie; Weijer, Charles; Peterson, Andrew; Naci, Lorina; Cruse, Damian; Fernández-Espejo, Davinia; Gonzalez-Lara, Laura; Owen, Adrian M.

In: Journal of Medical Ethics, Vol. 41, No. 7, 07.2015, p. 534-8.

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Graham, Mackenzie ; Weijer, Charles ; Peterson, Andrew ; Naci, Lorina ; Cruse, Damian ; Fernández-Espejo, Davinia ; Gonzalez-Lara, Laura ; Owen, Adrian M. / Acknowledging awareness : informing families of individual research results for patients in the vegetative state. In: Journal of Medical Ethics. 2015 ; Vol. 41, No. 7. pp. 534-8.

Bibtex

@article{2c2e303ebeef4630b82d981d4749c36d,
title = "Acknowledging awareness: informing families of individual research results for patients in the vegetative state",
abstract = "Recent findings in cognitive neuroscience have revealed that some patients previously diagnosed as being in a vegetative state may retain some degree of covert awareness. However, it is unclear whether such findings should be disclosed to the families of these patients. Concerns about the preservation of scientific validity, reliability of results and potential harms associated with disclosure suggest that individual research results should be disclosed only under certain conditions. In the following paper, we offer four criteria for the disclosure of individual research results. Because the results of functional neuroimaging studies to detect covert awareness in vegetative patients are scientifically valid, informative and reasonably reliable and have considerable potential benefit for the patient, researchers have an obligation to disclose such results to family members. Further work is needed to develop educational materials for families and to systematically study the impact of disclosure on the families themselves.",
author = "Mackenzie Graham and Charles Weijer and Andrew Peterson and Lorina Naci and Damian Cruse and Davinia Fern{\'a}ndez-Espejo and Laura Gonzalez-Lara and Owen, {Adrian M}",
note = "Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.",
year = "2015",
month = jul,
doi = "10.1136/medethics-2014-102078",
language = "English",
volume = "41",
pages = "534--8",
journal = "Journal of Medical Ethics",
issn = "0306-6800",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "7",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Acknowledging awareness

T2 - informing families of individual research results for patients in the vegetative state

AU - Graham, Mackenzie

AU - Weijer, Charles

AU - Peterson, Andrew

AU - Naci, Lorina

AU - Cruse, Damian

AU - Fernández-Espejo, Davinia

AU - Gonzalez-Lara, Laura

AU - Owen, Adrian M

N1 - Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

PY - 2015/7

Y1 - 2015/7

N2 - Recent findings in cognitive neuroscience have revealed that some patients previously diagnosed as being in a vegetative state may retain some degree of covert awareness. However, it is unclear whether such findings should be disclosed to the families of these patients. Concerns about the preservation of scientific validity, reliability of results and potential harms associated with disclosure suggest that individual research results should be disclosed only under certain conditions. In the following paper, we offer four criteria for the disclosure of individual research results. Because the results of functional neuroimaging studies to detect covert awareness in vegetative patients are scientifically valid, informative and reasonably reliable and have considerable potential benefit for the patient, researchers have an obligation to disclose such results to family members. Further work is needed to develop educational materials for families and to systematically study the impact of disclosure on the families themselves.

AB - Recent findings in cognitive neuroscience have revealed that some patients previously diagnosed as being in a vegetative state may retain some degree of covert awareness. However, it is unclear whether such findings should be disclosed to the families of these patients. Concerns about the preservation of scientific validity, reliability of results and potential harms associated with disclosure suggest that individual research results should be disclosed only under certain conditions. In the following paper, we offer four criteria for the disclosure of individual research results. Because the results of functional neuroimaging studies to detect covert awareness in vegetative patients are scientifically valid, informative and reasonably reliable and have considerable potential benefit for the patient, researchers have an obligation to disclose such results to family members. Further work is needed to develop educational materials for families and to systematically study the impact of disclosure on the families themselves.

U2 - 10.1136/medethics-2014-102078

DO - 10.1136/medethics-2014-102078

M3 - Article

C2 - 25079068

VL - 41

SP - 534

EP - 538

JO - Journal of Medical Ethics

JF - Journal of Medical Ethics

SN - 0306-6800

IS - 7

ER -