A universal scaling law of mammalian touch

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A universal scaling law of mammalian touch. / Andrews, James; Adams, Mike; Montenegro-Johnson, Tom.

In: Science Advances, Vol. 6, No. 41, eabb6912, 09.10.2020.

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@article{837a7a4401b64ab995bc9b72de7ca37e,
title = "A universal scaling law of mammalian touch",
abstract = "For most mammals, touch is the first sense to develop. They must feel vibrations on the surface of their skin to enable them to respond to various stimuli in their environment, a process called vibrotaction. But how do mammals perceive these vibrations? Through mathematical modeling of the skin and touch receptors, we show that vibrotaction is dominated by “surface” Rayleigh waves traveling cooperatively through all layers of the skin and bone. Applying our model to experimental data, we identify a universal scaling law for the depth of touch receptors across multiple species, indicating an evolutionarily conserved constant in the sensation of vibrations.",
author = "James Andrews and Mike Adams and Tom Montenegro-Johnson",
year = "2020",
month = oct,
day = "9",
doi = "10.1126/sciadv.abb6912",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
journal = "Science Advances",
issn = "2375-2548",
publisher = "American Association for the Advancement of Science",
number = "41",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A universal scaling law of mammalian touch

AU - Andrews, James

AU - Adams, Mike

AU - Montenegro-Johnson, Tom

PY - 2020/10/9

Y1 - 2020/10/9

N2 - For most mammals, touch is the first sense to develop. They must feel vibrations on the surface of their skin to enable them to respond to various stimuli in their environment, a process called vibrotaction. But how do mammals perceive these vibrations? Through mathematical modeling of the skin and touch receptors, we show that vibrotaction is dominated by “surface” Rayleigh waves traveling cooperatively through all layers of the skin and bone. Applying our model to experimental data, we identify a universal scaling law for the depth of touch receptors across multiple species, indicating an evolutionarily conserved constant in the sensation of vibrations.

AB - For most mammals, touch is the first sense to develop. They must feel vibrations on the surface of their skin to enable them to respond to various stimuli in their environment, a process called vibrotaction. But how do mammals perceive these vibrations? Through mathematical modeling of the skin and touch receptors, we show that vibrotaction is dominated by “surface” Rayleigh waves traveling cooperatively through all layers of the skin and bone. Applying our model to experimental data, we identify a universal scaling law for the depth of touch receptors across multiple species, indicating an evolutionarily conserved constant in the sensation of vibrations.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85092753534&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1126/sciadv.abb6912

DO - 10.1126/sciadv.abb6912

M3 - Article

VL - 6

JO - Science Advances

JF - Science Advances

SN - 2375-2548

IS - 41

M1 - eabb6912

ER -