A randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of self-weighing as a weight loss intervention

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@article{e06b4140a43f4960a337f908fc801821,
title = "A randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of self-weighing as a weight loss intervention",
abstract = "BackgroundThere is a need to find simple cost effective weight loss interventions that can be used in primary care. There is evidence that self-monitoring is an effective intervention for problem drinking and self-weighing might be an effective intervention for weight loss.PurposeTo examine the efficacy of daily self-weighing as an intervention for weight loss.MethodsA randomised controlled trial of 183 obese adults, follow-up three months. The intervention group were given a set of weighing scales and instructed to weigh themselves daily and record their weight. Both groups received two weight loss consultations which were known to be ineffective.Results92 participants were randomised to the intervention group and 91 to the control group. The intervention group lost 0.5 kg (95% CI 0.3 to 1.3 kg) more than the control group, but this was not significant. There was no evidence that self-weighing frequency was associated with more weight loss.ConclusionsAs an intervention for weight loss, instruction to weigh daily is ineffective. Unlike other studies, there was no evidence that greater frequency of self-weighing is associated with greater weight loss.",
keywords = "Weight loss, Obesity, Self-weighing, Self-monitoring",
author = "Madigan, {Claire D} and Catherine Jolly and Lewis, {Amanda L} and Paul Aveyard and Daley, {Amanda J}",
year = "2014",
month = oct
day = "10",
doi = "10.1186/s12966-014-0125-9",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
journal = "The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity",
issn = "1479-5868",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of self-weighing as a weight loss intervention

AU - Madigan, Claire D

AU - Jolly, Catherine

AU - Lewis, Amanda L

AU - Aveyard, Paul

AU - Daley, Amanda J

PY - 2014/10/10

Y1 - 2014/10/10

N2 - BackgroundThere is a need to find simple cost effective weight loss interventions that can be used in primary care. There is evidence that self-monitoring is an effective intervention for problem drinking and self-weighing might be an effective intervention for weight loss.PurposeTo examine the efficacy of daily self-weighing as an intervention for weight loss.MethodsA randomised controlled trial of 183 obese adults, follow-up three months. The intervention group were given a set of weighing scales and instructed to weigh themselves daily and record their weight. Both groups received two weight loss consultations which were known to be ineffective.Results92 participants were randomised to the intervention group and 91 to the control group. The intervention group lost 0.5 kg (95% CI 0.3 to 1.3 kg) more than the control group, but this was not significant. There was no evidence that self-weighing frequency was associated with more weight loss.ConclusionsAs an intervention for weight loss, instruction to weigh daily is ineffective. Unlike other studies, there was no evidence that greater frequency of self-weighing is associated with greater weight loss.

AB - BackgroundThere is a need to find simple cost effective weight loss interventions that can be used in primary care. There is evidence that self-monitoring is an effective intervention for problem drinking and self-weighing might be an effective intervention for weight loss.PurposeTo examine the efficacy of daily self-weighing as an intervention for weight loss.MethodsA randomised controlled trial of 183 obese adults, follow-up three months. The intervention group were given a set of weighing scales and instructed to weigh themselves daily and record their weight. Both groups received two weight loss consultations which were known to be ineffective.Results92 participants were randomised to the intervention group and 91 to the control group. The intervention group lost 0.5 kg (95% CI 0.3 to 1.3 kg) more than the control group, but this was not significant. There was no evidence that self-weighing frequency was associated with more weight loss.ConclusionsAs an intervention for weight loss, instruction to weigh daily is ineffective. Unlike other studies, there was no evidence that greater frequency of self-weighing is associated with greater weight loss.

KW - Weight loss

KW - Obesity

KW - Self-weighing

KW - Self-monitoring

U2 - 10.1186/s12966-014-0125-9

DO - 10.1186/s12966-014-0125-9

M3 - Article

C2 - 25301251

VL - 11

JO - The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity

JF - The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity

SN - 1479-5868

IS - 1

M1 - 125

ER -