A Neural Decomposition of Visual Search Using Voxel-based Morphometry

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A Neural Decomposition of Visual Search Using Voxel-based Morphometry. / Humphreys, Glyn W; Chechlacz, Magdalena.

In: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, Vol. 27, No. 9, 31.07.2015, p. 1854-1869.

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@article{62315e95469440f9b60d064a47f0bf7a,
title = "A Neural Decomposition of Visual Search Using Voxel-based Morphometry",
abstract = "The ability to search efficiently for visual targets among distractors can break down after a variety of brain lesions, but the specific processes affected by the lesions are unclear. We examined search over space (conjunction search) and over time plus space (preview search) in a consecutive series of patients with acquired brain lesions. We also assessed performance on standard neuropsychological measures of visuospatial short-term memory (Corsi Block), sustained attention and memory updating (the contrast between forward and backward digit span), and visual neglect. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed regions in the occipital (middle occipital gyrus), posterior parietal (angular gyrus), and temporal cortices (superior and middle temporal gyri extending to the insula), along with underlying white matter pathways, associated with poor search. Going beyond standard voxel-based morphometry analyses, we then report correlation measures of structural damage in these regions and the independent neuropsychological measures of other cognitive functions. We find distinct patterns of correlation in areas linked to poor search, suggesting that the areas play functionally different roles in search. We conclude that neuropsychological disorders of search can be linked to necessary and distinct cognitive functions, according to the site of lesion.",
keywords = "Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Attention, Brain, Brain Mapping, Executive Function, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Memory, Short-Term, Middle Aged, Neuropsychological Tests, Perceptual Disorders, Reaction Time, Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted, Space Perception, Time Perception, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't",
author = "Humphreys, {Glyn W} and Magdalena Chechlacz",
year = "2015",
month = jul,
day = "31",
doi = "10.1162/jocn_a_00828",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "1854--1869",
journal = "Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience",
issn = "0898-929X",
publisher = "Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press",
number = "9",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A Neural Decomposition of Visual Search Using Voxel-based Morphometry

AU - Humphreys, Glyn W

AU - Chechlacz, Magdalena

PY - 2015/7/31

Y1 - 2015/7/31

N2 - The ability to search efficiently for visual targets among distractors can break down after a variety of brain lesions, but the specific processes affected by the lesions are unclear. We examined search over space (conjunction search) and over time plus space (preview search) in a consecutive series of patients with acquired brain lesions. We also assessed performance on standard neuropsychological measures of visuospatial short-term memory (Corsi Block), sustained attention and memory updating (the contrast between forward and backward digit span), and visual neglect. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed regions in the occipital (middle occipital gyrus), posterior parietal (angular gyrus), and temporal cortices (superior and middle temporal gyri extending to the insula), along with underlying white matter pathways, associated with poor search. Going beyond standard voxel-based morphometry analyses, we then report correlation measures of structural damage in these regions and the independent neuropsychological measures of other cognitive functions. We find distinct patterns of correlation in areas linked to poor search, suggesting that the areas play functionally different roles in search. We conclude that neuropsychological disorders of search can be linked to necessary and distinct cognitive functions, according to the site of lesion.

AB - The ability to search efficiently for visual targets among distractors can break down after a variety of brain lesions, but the specific processes affected by the lesions are unclear. We examined search over space (conjunction search) and over time plus space (preview search) in a consecutive series of patients with acquired brain lesions. We also assessed performance on standard neuropsychological measures of visuospatial short-term memory (Corsi Block), sustained attention and memory updating (the contrast between forward and backward digit span), and visual neglect. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed regions in the occipital (middle occipital gyrus), posterior parietal (angular gyrus), and temporal cortices (superior and middle temporal gyri extending to the insula), along with underlying white matter pathways, associated with poor search. Going beyond standard voxel-based morphometry analyses, we then report correlation measures of structural damage in these regions and the independent neuropsychological measures of other cognitive functions. We find distinct patterns of correlation in areas linked to poor search, suggesting that the areas play functionally different roles in search. We conclude that neuropsychological disorders of search can be linked to necessary and distinct cognitive functions, according to the site of lesion.

KW - Adult

KW - Aged

KW - Aged, 80 and over

KW - Attention

KW - Brain

KW - Brain Mapping

KW - Executive Function

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Magnetic Resonance Imaging

KW - Male

KW - Memory, Short-Term

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Neuropsychological Tests

KW - Perceptual Disorders

KW - Reaction Time

KW - Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted

KW - Space Perception

KW - Time Perception

KW - Journal Article

KW - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

U2 - 10.1162/jocn_a_00828

DO - 10.1162/jocn_a_00828

M3 - Article

C2 - 26058605

VL - 27

SP - 1854

EP - 1869

JO - Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience

JF - Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience

SN - 0898-929X

IS - 9

ER -