'A giant mess’ – making sense of complexity in the accounts of people with fibromyalgia.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Authors

Colleges, School and Institutes

Abstract

Objectives
The diagnosis of fibromyalgia is based on self-report and indirect measures and thus is unavoidably influenced by patients' own understanding of their symptoms. In order to provide appropriate support for people with fibromyalgia, it is important to understand variation in patients' interpretations of their own symptoms.

Methods
Twenty people with fibromyalgia participated in email interviews exploring their experiences, history and diagnosis. Respondents answered a series of questions in their own time. Rich accounts were elicited. A hermeneutic phenomenological approach linked two stages of analysis. In the first instance, an in-depth, inductive analysis was developed around a subset of eight transcripts, using interpretative phenomenological analysis. The outcomes of this work were then used to inform a template analysis, which was applied to the remaining 12 transcripts, in order to extend and check the credibility of the in-depth analysis.

Results
Participants described enduring the course of a ‘giant mess’ of unpleasant symptoms, some of which were understood to be symptoms of fibromyalgia and some the interactive or parallel effects of comorbid illness. The respondents also demonstrated their considerable efforts at imposing order and sense on complexity and multiplicity, in terms of the instability of their symptoms. They expressed ambivalence towards diagnosis, doctors and medication, and we noted that each of the above areas appeared to come together to create a context of relational uncertainty, which undermined the security of connections to family, friends, colleagues and the workplace.

Conclusions
Three key issues were discussed. First, there was not one overall symptom (e.g., pain) driving the unpleasantness of fibromyalgia; second, participants spent excessive time and energy trying to manage forces outside their control; third, because there is no definitive ‘fibromyalgia experience’, each diagnosis is unique, and our participants often appeared to be struggling to understand the course of their illness. Issues of stigma and legitimacy need to be considered carefully by health professionals in the context of the complex and uncertain experience of patients.

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)763-781
Number of pages19
JournalBritish Journal of Health Psychology
Volume18
Issue number4
Early online date24 Jan 2013
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2013