A conceptual model of riparian forest restoration for natural flood management

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A conceptual model of riparian forest restoration for natural flood management. / Dixon, Simon J.; Sear, David A.; Nislow, Keith H.

In: Water and Environment Journal, 22.10.2018.

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@article{9e1e227dd290416493472c03a6e4b445,
title = "A conceptual model of riparian forest restoration for natural flood management",
abstract = "There is an increasing emphasis on using natural processes, including riparian forest restoration, to enhance the ecological, hydrological and geomorphological functioning of watercourses. However, we have insufficient knowledge on how the supply and retention of in-channel wood from riparian forest stands changes with age, with inferences typically based on data from terrestrial forests. This presents a challenge in estimating the efficacy and functional lifespan of restoration projects. In this paper, we use a riparian forest growth model to show there is a lag of up to 40–50 years between the start of forest growth and trees delivering wood to the channel that is large enough to resist fluvial transport, anchor logjams and so increase channel complexity and hydraulic resistance. Resource managers need to account for realistic timescales over which changes promoted by riparian woodland restoration will occur and may need to consider using interim engineered logjams as the forest develops.",
keywords = "ecohydrology, forest, large wood, natural flood management, restoration",
author = "Dixon, {Simon J.} and Sear, {David A.} and Nislow, {Keith H.}",
year = "2018",
month = oct
day = "22",
doi = "10.1111/wej.12425",
language = "English",
journal = "Water and Environment Journal",
issn = "1747-6585",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A conceptual model of riparian forest restoration for natural flood management

AU - Dixon, Simon J.

AU - Sear, David A.

AU - Nislow, Keith H.

PY - 2018/10/22

Y1 - 2018/10/22

N2 - There is an increasing emphasis on using natural processes, including riparian forest restoration, to enhance the ecological, hydrological and geomorphological functioning of watercourses. However, we have insufficient knowledge on how the supply and retention of in-channel wood from riparian forest stands changes with age, with inferences typically based on data from terrestrial forests. This presents a challenge in estimating the efficacy and functional lifespan of restoration projects. In this paper, we use a riparian forest growth model to show there is a lag of up to 40–50 years between the start of forest growth and trees delivering wood to the channel that is large enough to resist fluvial transport, anchor logjams and so increase channel complexity and hydraulic resistance. Resource managers need to account for realistic timescales over which changes promoted by riparian woodland restoration will occur and may need to consider using interim engineered logjams as the forest develops.

AB - There is an increasing emphasis on using natural processes, including riparian forest restoration, to enhance the ecological, hydrological and geomorphological functioning of watercourses. However, we have insufficient knowledge on how the supply and retention of in-channel wood from riparian forest stands changes with age, with inferences typically based on data from terrestrial forests. This presents a challenge in estimating the efficacy and functional lifespan of restoration projects. In this paper, we use a riparian forest growth model to show there is a lag of up to 40–50 years between the start of forest growth and trees delivering wood to the channel that is large enough to resist fluvial transport, anchor logjams and so increase channel complexity and hydraulic resistance. Resource managers need to account for realistic timescales over which changes promoted by riparian woodland restoration will occur and may need to consider using interim engineered logjams as the forest develops.

KW - ecohydrology

KW - forest

KW - large wood

KW - natural flood management

KW - restoration

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85055268390&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/wej.12425

DO - 10.1111/wej.12425

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85055268390

JO - Water and Environment Journal

JF - Water and Environment Journal

SN - 1747-6585

ER -