110th Anniversary: Slurryability: What Makes a Powder Hard to Incorporate into a Slurry?

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110th Anniversary : Slurryability: What Makes a Powder Hard to Incorporate into a Slurry? / Wood, Thomas; Simmons, Mark John H.; Greenwood, Richard W.; Turnbull, Stephanie A; Stitt, E. Hugh.

In: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, Vol. 58, No. 31, 07.08.2019, p. 14396-14409.

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@article{532e53d695514773aeae30b94bec6bac,
title = "110th Anniversary: Slurryability: What Makes a Powder Hard to Incorporate into a Slurry?",
abstract = "This paper investigates powder properties that are significant in determining how easily a powder may be incorporated into water to form a concentrated slurry. The slurryability of a powder is defined as the time and energy required to prepare a 50 wt % slurry as well as a threshold concentration at which 1 kJ is required to further increase the solid content by 1 wt % at the scale studied. Partial least-squares models relating powder properties to their slurryability are built on a data set of 13 powders. The most significant properties determining slurryability are the particle pore volume, powder bulk density, and the results of permeability and aeration tests on a powder rheometer. The D 50 particle size and powder cohesion measurements are also relevant in the models. Through the measurement of only these six properties, the slurryability of two further powders, not included in the training data set, were predicted within ±10%. ",
author = "Thomas Wood and Simmons, {Mark John H.} and Greenwood, {Richard W.} and Turnbull, {Stephanie A} and Stitt, {E. Hugh}",
year = "2019",
month = aug,
day = "7",
doi = "10.1021/acs.iecr.9b00572",
language = "English",
volume = "58",
pages = "14396--14409",
journal = "Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research",
issn = "0888-5885",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "31",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - 110th Anniversary

T2 - Slurryability: What Makes a Powder Hard to Incorporate into a Slurry?

AU - Wood, Thomas

AU - Simmons, Mark John H.

AU - Greenwood, Richard W.

AU - Turnbull, Stephanie A

AU - Stitt, E. Hugh

PY - 2019/8/7

Y1 - 2019/8/7

N2 - This paper investigates powder properties that are significant in determining how easily a powder may be incorporated into water to form a concentrated slurry. The slurryability of a powder is defined as the time and energy required to prepare a 50 wt % slurry as well as a threshold concentration at which 1 kJ is required to further increase the solid content by 1 wt % at the scale studied. Partial least-squares models relating powder properties to their slurryability are built on a data set of 13 powders. The most significant properties determining slurryability are the particle pore volume, powder bulk density, and the results of permeability and aeration tests on a powder rheometer. The D 50 particle size and powder cohesion measurements are also relevant in the models. Through the measurement of only these six properties, the slurryability of two further powders, not included in the training data set, were predicted within ±10%.

AB - This paper investigates powder properties that are significant in determining how easily a powder may be incorporated into water to form a concentrated slurry. The slurryability of a powder is defined as the time and energy required to prepare a 50 wt % slurry as well as a threshold concentration at which 1 kJ is required to further increase the solid content by 1 wt % at the scale studied. Partial least-squares models relating powder properties to their slurryability are built on a data set of 13 powders. The most significant properties determining slurryability are the particle pore volume, powder bulk density, and the results of permeability and aeration tests on a powder rheometer. The D 50 particle size and powder cohesion measurements are also relevant in the models. Through the measurement of only these six properties, the slurryability of two further powders, not included in the training data set, were predicted within ±10%.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85070387149&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1021/acs.iecr.9b00572

DO - 10.1021/acs.iecr.9b00572

M3 - Article

VL - 58

SP - 14396

EP - 14409

JO - Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research

JF - Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research

SN - 0888-5885

IS - 31

ER -