Ulrich Gunther

(Former)

Research interests

My main research interest has always been in Biomolecular NMR, covering protein NMR, metabolomics and Dynamic Nuclear Polarization. Currently my main research focus is centered around biomedical applications of NMR, in particular in hte field of metabolic phenotyping.

More  work on metabolic phenotyping has covered several areas of cancer. I have developed metabolic flux analysis, now funded by the EU network METAFLUX. Much of the recent work about metabolomics with Chris Bunce, Farhat Khanim, Mark Viant and Mark Drayson (for leukaemia), Derek Alderson (for oesophageal cancer).

Another field of research has been in Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) which has great potential in the context of metabolic flux analysis but also opens new avenues for NMR as it can boost its sensitivity by several orders of magnitude. My DNP research has been focussed on low temperature ex situ polarization. Recent work highlights quantum tunnelling as an additional polarisation mechanism at low temperatures.

I am also part of the at the Systems Science for Health scheme funded by the University of Birmingham, a new research initiative at the University of Birmingham focussed on Systems Science in a medical context with applications in cancer, inflammation and obesity.

I participate in several EU programmes and coordinator of the EU projetcs WW-NMR and METAFLUX.

 

Willingness to take PhD students

Yes

PhD projects

Ulrich Günther’s main research interest has always been in Biomolecular NMR with a primary focus on protein interactions. More recently he started to work on metabolic analysis, mainly in the context of cancer. He is developing this work in the direction of metabolic flux analysis.

Another field of research has been in dynamic nuclear polarisation (DNP) which has great potential in the context of metabolic flux analysis but also opens new avenues for NMR as it can boost its sensitivity by several orders of magnitude. His DNP research has been focused on low temperature ex situ polarisation. Recent work highlights quantum tunnelling as an additional polarisation mechanism at low temperatures.

Dr Günther is also part of the Systems Science for Health scheme, a new research initiative at the University, focused on Systems Science in a medical context with applications in cancer, inflammation and obesity.

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