Tim Jones

Tim Jones

Colleges, School and Institutes

Biography

Professor Tim Jones joined the University as Provost and Vice-Principal on 1 September 2016. Tim moved to Birmingham from Warwick, where he held a number of leadership positions, including Interim Provost, Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Science, Engineering and Medicine, Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Research, Knowledge Transfer and Business Engagement and Chair of the Faculty of Science.

Tim obtained his PhD in 1988 from the Chemistry Department at Liverpool University where he worked under the joint supervision of Professors Neville Richardson and Stephen Holloway. He then worked for two years as a postdoctoral research assistant in the Surface Science Research Centre at Liverpool, and spent a short period working at the Fritz-Haber Institute in Berlin on a Fellowship funded by the DAAD. Tim was appointed Lecturer in the Chemistry Department at Imperial College London in 1991, and was promoted to Reader (1997) and Professor of Chemical Physics (1998), as well as becoming the STS/Sumitomo Professor of Electronic Materials (2000-05). He took on several managerial roles at Imperial including Director of the Centre for Electronic Materials and Devices (2001-07) and Co-Director of the London Centre for Nanotechnology (2002-07), the latter a joint venture between Imperial College and University College London. After spending more than 16 years at Imperial he moved to the Chemistry Department at the University of Warwick (2007) as part of the University's strategic investment in advanced materials research.

Research interests

Tim’s research is focused on understanding and controlling the surface, interface and thin film properties of a range of inorganic and organic semiconductor materials, with applications in areas such as solar cells, light emitting diodes and sensors.Tim’s research is focused on understanding and controlling the surface, interface and thin film properties of a range of inorganic and organic semiconductor materials, with applications in areas such as solar cells, light emitting diodes and sensors.