Linda Wheeldon

(Former)

Linda Wheeldon

Research interests

The bulk of my research investigates language production processes, in particular, the processes underlying the generation of spoken sentences. My main interest is in the incremental planning of prosodic, lexical, and syntactic structure. I investigate the planning of grammatical structure in English and Japanese, using both reaction time and eye-tracking paradigms. I am also interested in the generation of the phonological structure of speech - how we generate the syllabic and segmental structure of words in isolation and in connected speech and how the rhythmic and intonation structure of utterances is planned. My interest in the sound structure of language has lead me to investigate the acquisition of phonological and prosodic representations in young children; the relationship between speech production and verbal short-term memory; and the role of phonological representations in silent reading and reading aloud. Recent research also focuses on the representation of morphological structure in the adult mental lexicon using fMRI techniques.

Willingness to take PhD students

Yes

PhD projects

Most of Linda Wheeldon’s research focuses on language production processes, in particular, the processes underlying the generation of spoken sentences. One of her major interests is in the nature and timing of sentence planning processes, in particular how much planning we usually accomplish before we begin to speak. She has investigated the advanced planning of grammatical structure, using both reaction time and eye-tracking paradigms.

She is also interested in the generation of the phonological structure of speech, ie, how we generate the syllabic and segmental structure of words in context and how the rhythmic and intonational structure of utterances is planned.

Additionally, she is interested in the acquisition of phonological and prosodic structure in young children and the role of phonological structure in reading. More recent research aims to investigate the representation of morphological structure in the adult mental lexicon using fMRI techniques.