Utilisation of a hydrogen uranyl phosphate-based ion exchanger supported on a biofilm for the removal of cobalt, strontium and caesium from aqueous solutions

M Paterson-Beedle, Lynne Macaskie, CH Lee, Joseph Hriljac, KY Jee, WH Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The problems of nuclear waste treatment and decontamination have been paramount for a number of years and continue to adversely affect the acceptability and expanded uses of nuclear power. By and large, methodologies for waste treatment exist at varying efficiency and correspondingly high expense. With a view to nuclear waste remediation, a novel bio-inorganic ion exchanger was developed which utilises a microbial system to synthesise hydrogen uranyl phosphate which serves as an intercalative ion exchanger for the fission products Cs-137, Sr-90 and the activation product Co-60. Hydrogen uranyl phosphate-coated Serratia sp. biofilm, immobilised onto polyurethane reticulated foam, was used in a flow through reactor, with complete substitution of H+ in the matrix by the intercalating target metal species. Experiments carried out in South Korea have confirmed these results using test nuclides (Cs-137, Sr-85 and Co-60), as well as water from a pool, where spent fuels are stored and cooled, sited in a post irradiation examination facility at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. Over 97% and similar to 85% removal of Cs-137 and Co-60, respectively, from the pool water were reported, at a flow residence time of 7 days. (C) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)141-145
Number of pages5
JournalHydrometallurgy
Volume83
Issue number1-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2006

Keywords

  • Serratia
  • cobalt
  • caesium
  • biofilm
  • hydrogen uranyl phosphate
  • strontium

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Utilisation of a hydrogen uranyl phosphate-based ion exchanger supported on a biofilm for the removal of cobalt, strontium and caesium from aqueous solutions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this