Towards optimum smoking cessation interventions during pregnancy: a household model to explore cost-effectiveness

Tuba Saygin Avsar, Louise Jackson, Pelham Barton, Matthew D. Jones, Hugh McLeod

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Abstract

Background and Aims: Previous economic evaluations of smoking cessation interventions for pregnant women are limited to single components, which do not in isolation offer sufficient potential impact to address smoking cessation targets. To inform the development of more appropriate complex interventions, we (1) describe the development of the Economics of Smoking in Pregnancy: Household (ESIP.H) model for estimating the life-time cost-effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions aimed at pregnant women and (2) use a hypothetical case study to demonstrate how ESIP.H can be used to identify the characteristics of optimum smoking cessation interventions.

Methods: The hypothetical intervention was based on current evidence relating to component elements, including financial incentives, partner smoking, intensive behaviour change support, cigarettes consumption and duration of support to 12 months post-partum. ESIP.H was developed to assess the life-time health and cost impacts of multi-component interventions compared with standard National Health Service (NHS) care in England. ESIP.H considers cigarette consumption, partner smoking and some health conditions (e.g. obesity) that were not included in previous models. The Markov model's parameters were estimated based on published literature, expert judgement and evidence-based assumptions. The hypothetical intervention was evaluated from an NHS perspective.

Results: The hypothetical intervention was associated with an incremental gain in quitters (mother and partner) at 12 months postpartum of 249 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 195–304] per 1000 pregnant smokers. Over the long-term, it had an incremental negative cost of £193 (CI = –£779 to 344) and it improved health, with a 0.50 (CI = 0.36–0.69) increase in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for mothers, partners and offspring, with a 100% probability of being cost-effective.

Conclusions: The Economics of Smoking in Pregnancy: Household model for estimating cost-effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions aimed at pregnant women found that a hypothetical smoking cessation intervention would greatly extend reach, reduce smoking and be cost-effective.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2707-2719
JournalAddiction
Volume117
Issue number10
Early online date23 May 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 23 May 2022

Keywords

  • Cost-effective
  • cost-utility
  • economic evaluation
  • health inequality
  • pregnancy
  • smoking cessation
  • tobacco

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