The prevalence and risk factors for acute respiratory infections in children aged 0-59 months in rural Malawi: A cross-sectional study

Miriam Cox, Louis Rose, Khumbo Kalua, Gilles de Wildt, Robin Bailey, John Hart

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3 Citations (Scopus)
120 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI) are a leading cause of childhood mortality and morbidity. Malawi has high childhood mortality but limited data on the prevalence of disease in the community.

METHODS: A cross-sectional study of children aged 0-59 months. Health passports were examined for ARI diagnoses in the preceding 12 months. Children were physically examined for malnutrition or current ARI.

RESULTS: 828 children participated. The annual prevalence of ARI was 32.6% (95% CI 29.3-36.0%). Having a sibling with ARI (OR 1.44, P = .01), increasing household density (OR 2.17, P = .02) and acute malnutrition (OR 1.69, P = .01) were predictors of infection in the last year. The point prevalence of ARI was 8.3% (95% CI 6.8-10.4%). Risk factors for current ARI were acute-on-chronic malnutrition (OR 3.06, P = .02), increasing household density (OR1.19, P = .05) and having a sibling with ARI (OR 2.30, P = .02).

CONCLUSION: This study provides novel data on the high prevalence of ARI in Malawi. This baseline data can be used in the monitoring and planning of future interventions in this population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)489-496
Number of pages8
JournalInfluenza and other respiratory viruses
Volume11
Issue number6
Early online date21 Sep 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Nov 2017

Keywords

  • Journal Article

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