The perils of integration: exploring the experiences of African American and black Caribbean students in predominately white secondary schools

Thandeka K. Chapman, Kalwant Bhopal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)
211 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Racial minority students who attend predominately white schools in the United States and England face unique challenges in their learning environments that are connected to their status as non-white students. Scholars have documented the experiences of racial and ethnic minority students in mixed-raced schools in the U.S. and the UK for over four decades. However, the authors explore new research territory by employing Critical Race Analysis (CRT) to further articulate the similar experiences shared by African American and black Caribbean students’ in mixed-race schools. Using data two different studies, one in the United States and one in England, the authors highlight the resemblances between the experiences of African American and black Caribbean students in predominantly white suburban and rural secondary schools. To increase racial equity in education, we must accurately understand the structural and societal barriers that racial minority students face as they continue to access education resources and quality schools.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1110 - 1129
JournalEthnic and Racial Studies
Volume42
Issue number7
Early online date1 Aug 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 1 Aug 2018

Keywords

  • critical race theory
  • suburban
  • rural
  • integration
  • England
  • United States

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