The latest vertebrates are the earliest

RICHARD J. ALDRIDGE, DEREK E.G. BRIGGS, IVAN J. SANSOM, M. PAUL SMITH

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The teeth, or elements, ofconodonts are among the most important Palaeozoic microfossils. Despite this, the biological relationships of conodonts have long remained enigmatic. Recent evidence of their soft anatomy, and of the ultrastructure of the elements, has finally revealed that they are vertebrates. These discoveries push vertebrate origins firmly back into the Cambrian and add a large cohort of specialists to the ranks of the vertebrate palaeontologists.

Original languageEnglish
Pages141-145
Number of pages5
Volume10
No.4
Specialist publicationGeology Today
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Stratigraphy
  • Palaeontology

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