The incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease in UK primary care: a retrospective cohort study of the IQVIA Medical Research Database

Karoline Freeman, Ronan Ryan, Nicholas Parsons, Sian Taylor-Phillips, Brian H Willis, Aileen Clarke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Our knowledge of the incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is uncertain. Recent studies reported an increase in prevalence. However, they excluded a high proportion of ambiguous cases from general practice. Estimates are needed to inform health care providers who plan the provision of services for IBD patients. We aimed to estimate the IBD incidence and prevalence in UK general practice.

METHODS: We undertook a retrospective cohort study of routine electronic health records from the IQVIA Medical Research Database covering 14 million patients. Adult patients from 2006 to 2016 were included. IBD was defined as an IBD related Read code or record of IBD specific medication. Annual incidence and 12-month period prevalence were calculated.

RESULTS: The prevalence of IBD increased between 2006 and 2016 from 106.2 (95% CI 105.2-107.3) to 142.1 (95% CI 140.7-143.5) IBD cases per 10,000 patients which is a 33.8% increase. Incidence varied across the years. The incidence across the full study period was 69.5 (95% CI 68.6-70.4) per 100,000 person years.

CONCLUSIONS: In this large study we found higher estimates of IBD incidence and prevalence than previously reported. Estimates are highly dependent on definitions of disease and previously may have been underestimated.

Original languageEnglish
Article number139
Number of pages7
JournalBMC Gastroenterology
Volume21
Issue number1
Early online date26 Mar 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2021

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Biomedical Research
  • Humans
  • Incidence
  • Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/epidemiology
  • Prevalence
  • Primary Health Care
  • Retrospective Studies
  • United Kingdom/epidemiology

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