The impact of transition programmes on workplace bullying, violence, stress and resilience for students and new graduate nurses: a scoping review

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Abstract

Aims and Objectives: This scoping review aims to identify whether transition programmes support new graduate nurses and nursing students in terms of dealing with workplace violence, bullying and stress and enhance new graduate nurses' resilience during the transition from education to clinical practice.

Background: Many new graduate nurses in their first year of employment experience issues at work such as violence, bullying and stress, which forces them to leave their jobs. Nursing students also experienced these issues during their clinical rotation. However, some hospitals and universities have developed transition programmes to help nursing students and new graduate nurses and ease their transition from education to clinical practice. Although transition programmes have been successful in increasing the retention rate for new graduate nurses, their impact on supporting new graduate nurses and nursing students in dealing with workplace violence, bullying and stress and in enhancing their resilience is unknown.

Design: A scoping review of the current literature (with no date limit) using the PRISMA-ScR checklist for reporting scoping reviews was utilised.

Method: Following the scoping review framework of Arksey and O'Malley, a broad search (with no date limit) was performed in CINAHL, Scopus, Medline, Web of Science, ASSIA, PsycINFO, Embase, PROSPERO and ProQuest Dissertation databases. Reference lists of the included studies were searched.

Results: This review found that most transition programmes provide support for new graduate nurses when dealing with workplace violence, bullying and stress. Transition programmes varied in length, content and implementation. Preceptors' support, educational sessions and safe work environments are the most beneficial elements of transition programmes for supporting new graduate nurses. Education sessions about resilience provide new graduate nurses with knowledge about how to deal and cope with stressful situations in the work environment. We found no studies that focused on nursing students.

Conclusion: The paucity of research on transition programmes' impact on workplace violence and bullying means that further research is recommended. This to determine which strategies support nursing students and new graduate nurses in clinical practice and to explore the effect of these programmes on experiences of workplace violence and bullying.

Relevance to Clinical Practice: Evidence indicates that there is a worldwide gap in how universities and colleges prepare nursing students for transitioning from the education system to clinical practice. New graduate nurses and nurse managers regularly report that their education did not fully provide them with the skills required for their transition to clinical practice. Transition programmes support new graduate nurses to deal with workplace violence and bullying and need to have structured implementation. Ongoing evaluation is required to ensure that the programmes meet the needs of nursing students and new graduate nurses and health organisations, improve new graduate nurses' transition to clinical practice safely, enhance their resilience to overcome issues in the workplace (such as violence, bullying and stress) and reduce their turnover.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Clinical Nursing
Early online date22 Nov 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 22 Nov 2021

Keywords

  • new graduate nurses
  • nurse residency programmes
  • nursing students
  • stress
  • transition programmes
  • workplace bullying
  • workplace violence

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