The effects of goal involvement on moral behavior in an experimentally manipulated competitive setting

Luke Sage, Maria Kavussanu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

41 Citations (Scopus)
398 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In this experiment we examined the effects of task and ego involvement on three measures of moral behavior-prosocial choice, observed prosocial behavior, and observed antisocial behavior-in a competitive setting. We also investigated sex differences in moral behavior. Male (n = 48) and female (n = 48) college students were randomly assigned to a task-involving, an ego-involving, or a control condition. Participants played two 10-min games of table soccer and completed measures of prosocial choice, goal involvement, goal orientation, and demographics. The two games were recorded, and frequencies of prosocial and antisocial behavior were coded. Players assigned to the task-involving condition were higher in prosocial choice than those in the ego-involving or control conditions. Individuals in the ego-involving condition displayed more antisocial behaviors than those in the task-involving or control conditions. Finally, females displayed more prosocial behaviors than males.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)190-207
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of sport & exercise psychology
Volume29
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2007

Keywords

  • task involvement
  • prosocial behavior
  • ego involvement
  • antisocial behavior
  • competition

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