The Effect of Elevated Air Pressure on the Oxidation Properties of the Nickel-based Superalloy, RR1000, at 650°C with Different Surface Modifications

Mary Taylor, Hugh Evans, Thomas Reynolds, Dan Child

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
141 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Samples of RR1000 with differing grain size and surface finish have been exposed to air at different pressures. Specimens were exposed for 4000 hours at 650°C with some exposed to atmospheric pressure air and some exposed to air at 40 bar pressure. Samples exposed to elevated pressure formed a surface layer of NiCr2O4 whereas that formed on samples tested at 1 bar pressure was chromia. The surface layer formed at 40 bar pressure was thinner than that a 1 bar pressure. At 1 bar pressure, some samples exhibited regions of convoluted buckled oxides but no spallation. In adjacent regions of planar oxides, spallation did occur. For the latter case, an estimate of 6 Jm-2 for the interfacial fracture energy has been made. None of the specimens tested at 40 bar pressure exhibited oxide spallation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)130-140
JournalMaterials at High Temperatures
Volume35
Issue number1-3
Early online date17 Oct 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2018

Keywords

  • Oxidation
  • Pressure
  • Chromia former
  • Superalloy
  • Spinel
  • XRD

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