The Climate and Environment of Byzantine Anatolia: Integrating Science, History and Archaeology

John Haldon, Warren Eastwood, Neil Roberts, Adam Izdebski, Dominik Fleitmann, Michael McCormick, Marica Cassis, Owen Doonan, Hugh Elton, Sabine Ladstätter, Sturt Manning, James Newhard, Kathleen Nicoll, Ioannes Telelis, Elena Xoplaki

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

62 Citations (Scopus)
222 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The integration of high-resolution archaeological, textual, and environmental data with longer-term, low-resolution data affords greater precision in identifying some of the causal relationships underlying societal change. Regional and microregional case studies about the Byzantine world—in particular, Anatolia, which for several centuries was the heart of that world—reveal many of the difficulties that researchers face when attempting to assess the influence of environmental factors on human society. The Anatolian case challenges a number of assumptions about the impact of climatic factors on socio-political organization and medium-term historical evolution, highlighting the importance of further collaboration between historians, archaeologists, and climate scientists.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)113-161
Number of pages49
JournalJournal of Interdisciplinary History
Volume45
Issue number2
Early online date13 Aug 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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