Surgery corrects asynchrony of ribcage secondary to extra-thoracic tumor but leads to expiratory dysfunction during exercise

Ghazi Elshafie, Andrea Aliverti, Ludovica Pippa, Prem Kumar, Maninder Kalkat, Babu Naidu

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: The effect of chest wall tumours on chest wall mechanics is uncertain even less is known about the effects of resection and reconstruction. Our aim is to study how chest wall mechanics are altered in chest wall sarcoma and to determine the effect of chest wall reconstruction on chest wall kinetics.

CASE PRESENTATION: Using Optoelectronic Plethysmography (OEP), total and regional chest wall volumes were measured in a patient with unilateral extra-thoracic chest wall sarcoma, before and 5 months after resection and reconstruction, during quiet breathing and exercise using cycle ergometry. During quiet breathing the unilateral tumour was associated with reduced in motion of the lower rib cage and abdominal compartments on both sides of the chest as well as asynchronous motion of the contralateral lower rib cage. Surgery corrected these abnormalities in quiet breathing. But during exercise there was a reduction in the upper rib cage motion compared to pre-operative measures from 0.43+/-0.06 to 0.36 +/- 0.02 L postoperatively (p <0.05). This impairment was characterised by a significant increase in the end expiratory volume on the operated side of the chest 5 months after surgery by 6.5 +/- 0.6 and 5.7 +/- 0.7 % during 50 and 100 % exercise respectively (p <0.0001) a finding that was not replicated in the non-operated side.

CONCLUSION: This physiological study demonstrates the negative effect of chest wall tumours on global chest wall mechanics during quiet breathing and exercise and shows that surgery reverses this abnormality, but only at rest.

Original languageEnglish
Article number187
JournalJournal of Cardiothoracic Surgery
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Dec 2015

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