Shining light into dark shadows of violence and learned helplessness: peace education in South Korean schools

Soonjung Kwon, David Ian Walker, Kristján Kristjánsson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The paper illustrates how a culture of violence is perpetuated and reproduced in South Korea through schooling and argues that peace education could help transform a culture of violence to a culture of peace. Critical ethnographic methods and a framework of peace education were applied to a sample of secondary schools in South Korea to argue that a disturbing culture of violence and learned helplessness were present; this comprises themes of direct and indirect violence through iljin (a group of students who are considered key perpetrators of school violence); a colonized false ideology and resistance to social justice. More positively, findings are also used to generate possibilities for pedagogical change based on peace education–an approach that proves useful both as an analytical frame for examining peace-violence relations in education and society and as an essential pedagogy for progressing towards peace in South Korean schools.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)24-47
    Number of pages24
    JournalJournal of Peace Education
    Volume15
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2 Jan 2018

    Keywords

    • critical ethnography
    • peace education
    • pedagogical change
    • South Korean schools

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Education
    • Sociology and Political Science
    • Political Science and International Relations

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