Self-reported physical activity and major adverse events in patients with atrial fibrillation: a report from the EURObservational Research Programme Pilot Survey on Atrial Fibrillation (EORP-AF) General Registry

Marco Proietti, Giuseppe Boriani, Cécile Laroche, Igor Diemberger, Mircea I. Popescu, Lars H. Rasmussen, Gianfranco Sinagra, Gheorghe-andrei Dan, Aldo P. Maggioni, Luigi Tavazzi, Deirdre A. Lane, Gregory Lip

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Abstract

Aims: Physical activity is protective against cardiovascular (CV) events, both in general population and in high-risk CV cohorts. However, the relationship between physical activity with major adverse outcomes in atrial fibrillation (AF) is not well-established. Our aim was to analyse this relationship in a ‘real-world’ AF population. Second, we investigated the influence of physical activity on arrhythmia progression. Methods and results: We studied all patients enrolled in the EURObservational Research Programme on AF (EORP-AF) Pilot Survey. Physical activity was defined as ‘none’, ‘occasional’, ‘regular’, and ‘intense’, based on patient self-reporting. Data on physical activity were available for 2442 patients: 38.9% reported none, 34.7% occasional, 21.7% regular, and 4.7% intense physical activity. Prevalence of the principal CV risk factors progressively decreased from none to intense physical activity. Lower rates of CV death, all-cause death, and composite outcomes were found in AF patients who reported regular and intense physical activity (P < 0.0001). Increasing physical activity was inversely associated with CV death/any thromboembolic event (TE)/bleeding in the whole cohort, irrespective of gender, paroxysmal AF, elderly age, or high stroke risk. Any level of physical activity intensity was significantly associated with lower risk of CV death/any TE/bleeding at 1-year follow-up. Physical activity was not significantly associated with arrhythmia progression. Conclusion: Atrial fibrillation patients taking regular exercise were associated with a lower risk of all-cause death, even when we considered various subgroups, including gender, elderly age, symptomatic status, and stroke risk class. Efforts to increase physical activity among AF patients may improve outcomes in these patients.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropace
Early online date2 Jun 2016
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2 Jun 2016

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