Ockham on the Side of the Angels: Why a Classical Theist Shouldn't be Moved by Oppy's Argument from Simplicity

Tyler Mcnabb, Michael Devito

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    A common argument put forth by naturalists (including the prominent philosopher Graham Oppy) in support of naturalism as a worldview over theism, is to claim that naturalism is a simpler hypothesis. Theism posits the existence of everything that naturalism does, plus the existence of a theistic realm. Thus, all things being equal, via Ockham's Razor, naturalism should be preferred to theism. In this essay, we argue that the Classical Theist need not worry about the naturalist's Simplicity argument. Specifically, we argue that, the one holding to a scholastic metaphysics (i.e., potency-act distinction, participatory metaphysics, and existence-in-degree), in the end, will be the one with the simpler worldview.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalNew Blackfriars
    Early online date25 Jun 2022
    DOIs
    Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 25 Jun 2022

    Keywords

    • Naturalism
    • Theism
    • Oppy
    • Simplicity
    • Classical Theism

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